Diversity – Dive Gear JP http://divegearjp.com/ Thu, 08 Jul 2021 03:12:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://divegearjp.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon.png Diversity – Dive Gear JP http://divegearjp.com/ 32 32 CSI named one of Forbes’ Top Diversity Employers https://divegearjp.com/csi-named-one-of-forbes-top-diversity-employers/ https://divegearjp.com/csi-named-one-of-forbes-top-diversity-employers/#respond Tue, 22 Jun 2021 11:35:00 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/csi-named-one-of-forbes-top-diversity-employers/ PADUCAH, Ky .– (COMMERCIAL THREAD) –Computer Services, Inc. (CSI) (OTCQX: CSVI), a leading provider of end-to-end fintech and regtech solutions, was selected as one of America’s Top Employers for Diversity Forbes 2021. The fourth annual list is a project of Forbes and Statista, and honors companies demonstrating a strong commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion. […]]]>

PADUCAH, Ky .– (COMMERCIAL THREAD) –Computer Services, Inc. (CSI) (OTCQX: CSVI), a leading provider of end-to-end fintech and regtech solutions, was selected as one of America’s Top Employers for Diversity Forbes 2021. The fourth annual list is a project of Forbes and Statista, and honors companies demonstrating a strong commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion.

Founded in 1965, CSI employs nearly 1,300 people and delivers financial technology and regulatory compliance solutions US financial institutions as well as corporate clients, both foreign and domestic. The company is committed to maintaining a people-centered culture, driven by innovation and exceptional customer service, while providing all employees with a respectful environment in which they can pursue learning opportunities, broaden their skills. and advance in their careers.

“At CSI, we strive to develop a workforce that embraces diversity and inclusiveness,” said David Culbertson, President and COO of CSI. “We encourage our employees to view their respective experiences as strengths, which allows them to better collaborate with their colleagues and meet the evolving needs of our clients. We are proud to be recognized by Forbes for our ongoing efforts to create an inclusive environment where every employee feels valued, safe and respected.

To determine the list, Forbes partnered with Statista to anonymously survey 50,000 Americans working for companies with 1,000 or more employees. Respondents ranked their organizations on criteria such as age, gender, ethnicity, disability and gender equality. The 500 companies with the highest total scores were recognized in the 2021 ranking of the best employers for diversity in the United States.

CSI also placed 33rd of 500 companies on Forbes’ U.S. Business List top midsize employers for 2021. This list, also provided by Statista, identifies the organizations most valued by their employees.

For more information on the list of Best Diversity Employers, including full eligibility criteria, visit www.forbes.com.

About Computer Services, Inc.

Computer Services, Inc. (CSI) provides core processing, digital banking, managed services, payment processing, print and electronic document distribution, and regulatory compliance solutions to financial institutions and corporate clients, both foreign than national. Management believes that exceptional service, dynamic solutions and superior results are the foundation of CSI’s reputation and have helped the company to achieve top industry rankings such as IDC Financial Insights FinTech 100, Talkin ‘Cloud 100 and MSPmentor Top 501 Global Managed Service Providers. . CSI was also recognized by Aite Group, an industry leading research company, as providing the “best user experience” in its 2019 AIM assessment: Leading Providers of Basic Banking Systems in the United States. In addition, CSI’s record of increasing its dividend every year for 49 years has earned it a designation as one of the “Dividend Aristocrats” in financial media. CSI shares trade on OTCQX under the symbol CSVI. For more information visit csiweb.com.

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3 red flags show that a company does not value diversity and equity https://divegearjp.com/3-red-flags-show-that-a-company-does-not-value-diversity-and-equity/ https://divegearjp.com/3-red-flags-show-that-a-company-does-not-value-diversity-and-equity/#respond Tue, 22 Jun 2021 11:30:07 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/3-red-flags-show-that-a-company-does-not-value-diversity-and-equity/ About two years after her stint at a cannabis startup, Lauren Chanel Allen was brutally fired. As the company’s chief digital marketing officer, Allen was on the cusp of a substantial pay rise that would roughly double his salary. Then, a day before her raise took effect, Allen claims she was fired for the way […]]]>

About two years after her stint at a cannabis startup, Lauren Chanel Allen was brutally fired. As the company’s chief digital marketing officer, Allen was on the cusp of a substantial pay rise that would roughly double his salary. Then, a day before her raise took effect, Allen claims she was fired for the way she spoke to a white coworker.

“It wasn’t a complete shock to me,” Allen says. “There were little things that happened. I was the only black employee there. When Allen interviewed for the job, she made it clear that she would push the company to tackle the fact that white entrepreneurs are profiting massively from the cannabis industry, excluding the very communities that had been penalized for disproportionately by the war on drugs. At the time, she says, the company seemed receptive to her point of view. “What interests me in this situation is how the people in power know the rhetoric to use, up to a point,” she said. “They said all the right things because it was important for them to have a black face.”

As workers demand more from their employers, the balance of power in American workplaces is shifting. Even companies that were once reluctant to tackle social issues have taken a stand on racial equity and committed to working for a more diverse workforce. And in the past year in particular, following public pressure unleashed by a summer of protests, countless employers have made significant financial contributions to racial justice organizations and reorganized their fairness and accountability practices. inclusion. But companies have also become smarter over time, making it harder for job seekers to distinguish between companies that are truly invested in DCI’s work and those with vociferous commitments to fairness. are just a facade.

Diversity is so hot right now,” says Erin Ford, who leads learning and talent development at the General Assembly and helps students enter the workforce. “Companies kind of understand that this is how talent sees them. And I think it’s hard for people in the workforce to know if this company really lives up to those values ​​or if it’s performing quite well. Even so, there are signs that a potential employer is underinvesting in equity and inclusion, or investing more in the perspective of DCI as a business value.

When you’re the only one in the room

For Allen and others, it can be a glaring red flag if a company is so cohesive that it would be the only non-white employee in the room. “In general, I don’t think a black person should be looking for opportunities to be the only black person,” Allen says. “It is often not worth it for a black person to be the desegregating employee of a company.” (When Allen raised the hiring issue with his former employer, he was told that the company is trying to find non-white candidates, but “it’s so hard to find qualified people.”) Current role in a cryptocurrency firm, Allen is still the only black employee, but she’s not the only employee of color – an experience that she says is markedly different.

Lawrence Humphrey, Design Strategist and Consultant at IBM and Founder of Tech Can [Do] Better, agrees that it can be overwhelming when a company does not have black employees. But Humphrey doesn’t necessarily see it as a bugle signal. “I am of the opinion: you cannot change the nature of the game unless you have a seat at the table,” Humphrey says, adding that he has often been in spaces where he was the only black person. “If a company really wants to change its culture, there has to be a black first employee. It has to start somewhere.

In cases where a company has little or no diversity in its leadership ranks, Judene Small Jean-Louis says to be careful “if your keen sense starts to tingle” and the organization is dropping employees who look like you. “In past lives, people who are not part of the leadership team or decision makers were invited to join meetings, especially when they wanted to show that there was a face that seemed familiar to them.” , explains Petit Jean-Louis, who runs a strategic and operational marketing consulting firm and digital media company RootsxWings.

When top-down DEI investments are minimal

One way to determine a company’s commitment to equity and inclusion is to ask more specific questions about how the organization values ​​diversity and whether it can disclose workforce metrics. work or other benchmarks. If an employer’s efforts are outperforming, this may be reflected in the amount or little investment the company has invested in DCI initiatives, both in terms of human capital and financial resources. . A sprawling tech company, for example, shouldn’t have a level employee associated with the head of DEI, says Ford. “Whatever representation they have, it has to be appropriate for the size of the organization,” she says. “I wouldn’t expect an enterprise-level company to have anything less than a vice president of DCI.”

Humphrey also found that some companies are approaching him with DCI opportunities, rather than tech roles, or assume he will be interested in additional DCI work. “People reached out to me and basically tried to get me to work at DCI at other tech companies,” he says. “I don’t want to do this. I don’t intend to make DEI my goal.

Another indicator of an employer’s true intentions may be that the company seems to rely too much on ERGs or employee resource groups. These groups can be a source of support and camaraderie for under-represented workers, but should not be a substitute for DCI leadership or compensation-related diversity goals. “In my experience, ERGs still exist at the request of the parent company,” says Moses Harris, software architect at a large technology company. “It is above all a social place. So you can reach out and say, “Look, people like me exist. I have a connection. I have a place to go where my sanity is taken care of. People are going through the same problems as me. But it is more of a support structure than a real driver of change.

When corporate culture makes you think

Even a company’s approach to the hiring process can be revealing, says Small Jean-Louis. “If you see that they don’t intend to follow up and respect your time, that’s indicative of a habit in their culture,” she says. “When looking to join companies, take a good look at the process. A red flag that Small Jean-Louis has picked up on over the years, and especially in the midst of the pandemic, is when companies overlook her resume or outright reject her, but then express interest after being referred by someone. a – a model also observed by her Black girlfriends. “I think there is a lot to see about companies and their culture in the way they run [hiring],” she says.

In retrospect, Allen realizes that the lack of human resources foreshadowed his experience in the cannabis startup. “I didn’t think to ask, do we have HR now? ” she says. “It was a recurring joke, like, ‘We need HR now!’ And before Allen’s white friend encouraged him to negotiate, the company had even offered a title that didn’t fit the job responsibilities. “Looking back, I think a red flag is if you compare the title and the responsibilities, and the title is pretty basic; I think that’s due to how much they plan to value you, ”she says. “As a black woman, that was fine with me because the salary at the time was an improvement. The team seemed cool; I’m in this new space and I’m moving to LA, and they cover the moving expenses. “

Sometimes even seemingly innocuous comments about a company’s culture or employee attributes most valued can alert you. If a company has a bad workplace culture, chances are high that DCI is not a top priority and that black and brown employees can be disproportionately affected by these issues. “It’s things like, ‘The people who work here tend to believe in the business, and we don’t take a lot of time off,’” says Harris. ” I get it. And it lets you know [that] either you’re gonna work your ass and be successful there, or you’re not gonna stay there long.

Harris is also more sensitive to signs he might have overlooked earlier in his career. “At the time,” he says, “I heard about the lack of parental leave, and instead of [thinking] They don’t treat their employees very well, I [would think] Well, I don’t plan on having kids anytime soon. So I guess it’s good for me to work in this company. it doesn’t really affect me. “Now Harris sees it differently and recognizes that a corporate exclusion policy may indicate a broader lack of support for underrepresented employees.” It doesn’t affect me, but it does affect the person next door. about me, “he says of bad parental leave policies.” Do I want to be one of those who support this? “

While news articles and anonymous accounts on platforms like Glassdoor can offer insight into a company’s culture, Harris and others believe that the best way to assess a potential employer is to talk to former employees and current. “I really try to have some sort of inside information when I make these kinds of decisions,” he says. “You really need to contact your network because you will never get this information until you work for the company. All you will discover from the outside will be: they tick all of those boxes. “

These days, Little Jean-Louis does not even apply for a job without consulting someone who has worked in the company in question. “Somewhere between praise and absolute shit storm lies the truth,” she says. “Recognize that not all the press will give you the whole story, but you have to stay in control. You spend more hours [at work] than at home, and I think everyone is well aware of that now with the opening up to the world, so choose your spaces wisely.

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LaVar Charleston named next UW-Madison Diversity Director https://divegearjp.com/lavar-charleston-named-next-uw-madison-diversity-director/ https://divegearjp.com/lavar-charleston-named-next-uw-madison-diversity-director/#respond Tue, 22 Jun 2021 11:19:52 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/lavar-charleston-named-next-uw-madison-diversity-director/ Charleston, a clinical professor of higher education in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis, also experienced the campus as a student – he received his Masters and PhD at UW-Madison. Photo: Bryce Richter LaVar Charleston, an innovative leader and accomplished researcher with nearly two decades of experience in diversity, equity and inclusion in […]]]>

Charleston, a clinical professor of higher education in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis, also experienced the campus as a student – he received his Masters and PhD at UW-Madison. Photo: Bryce Richter

LaVar Charleston, an innovative leader and accomplished researcher with nearly two decades of experience in diversity, equity and inclusion in higher education, has been appointed to lead the diversity and inclusion efforts of the ‘University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Charleston will serve as the university’s head of diversity, also holding the titles of Assistant Vice-Chancellor for Diversity and Inclusion, Vice-President and Elzie Higginbottom Director of Division of Diversity, Equity and Academic Success (DDEEA). It will start on August 2.

“This is a role of the utmost importance as we continue to work for a day when every member of our university community can thrive, without any obstacle to success,” said Chancellor Rebecca Blank. “Dr. Charleston fully understands the challenges ahead and brings a comprehensive and impressive set of skills to meet them. I am delighted to see where his leadership is taking us.

Watch a video message from Dr Charleston

Charleston is currently the Senior Associate Dean for Equity, Diversity and Inclusion at UW-Madison’s School of Education, where he is a Clinical Professor of Higher Education in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis. He obtained a master’s degree and a doctorate. of the department in 2007 and 2010, respectively.

“It is with gratitude and a deep sense of responsibility that I take on this new role,” says Charleston. “UW-Madison means so much to me – this is where I grew up as an academic, researcher and administrator. I want every member of the campus community to feel welcome, accepted and supported here.

In his new role, Charleston will provide overall leadership for the university’s efforts to create a diverse, inclusive and successful learning and working environment for all students, faculty, staff, alumni and other partners of the university. He will work in partnership with schools, colleges and other administrative units across the campus while overseeing the units that make up the DDEEA.

About the DDEEA

Students in the Posse program pose around the statue of Bucky on Lake Mendota.

Students in the Posse program pose around the statue of Bucky on Lake Mendota. The program is one of six pre-university, recruiting and retention programs managed by the division.

The Diversity, Equity and Academic Success Division strives to ensure an inclusive environment that encompasses not only race, gender, sexual orientation, socio-economic status, disability status, religion and national origin, but also a diversity of educational heritages and human experiences from a wide range of perspectives and cultural backgrounds.

The Division’s preschool, recruitment and retention efforts include:

The Division’s service units are:

Charleston will be part of the university’s leadership teams, including the Chancellor’s Executive Committee and Provost’s Executive Group.

Charleston says he will approach his new role with a keen awareness of how racial and social unrest and a pandemic have made the past two years very difficult for many members of the campus community, especially students and others from across the campus. BIPOC (Blacks, Aboriginals and people from communities of color).

“These are difficult and challenging times, but they are also encouraging times because there is renewed energy on our campus,” he says. “We have more allies than we have had in recent times, and there is a renewed sense of ownership and responsibility when it comes to anti-racist practices and ensuring our environments are inclusive. . “

Charleston says her job will be to “look under the hood” and figure out what works and what doesn’t.

“For people who work in diversity, we’ve been very busy, but that’s a good thing,” he says. “We are in the process of synthesizing our role in shaping culture and putting in place the structures that need to be in place for everyone to feel in their place. There are so many groups on campus doing this work, and everyone from the chancellor and provost to our deans are making a concerted effort around diversity and inclusion. It is a time of hope.

Charleston received a bachelor’s degree in public relations from Ball State University in 2002. He arrived at UW-Madison in 2005 as the site coordinator for the Pre-University Enrichment Opportunity Program for Learning Excellence (PEOPLE).

Other positions at UW-Madison followed, including a long affiliation with the Wisconsin Center for Education Research, where he helped found Wisconsin Equity and Inclusion Lab (Wei LAB). He has held numerous positions at Wei LAB, including that of Deputy Director and Coordinator of the Research and Evaluation Division. Charleston’s research focuses on diversity, access, and inclusion in the disciplines of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM). He is the author or co-author of 50 manuscripts, including the book “Advancing Equity and Diversity in Student Affairs”.

From 2017 to 2019, Charleston served as the First Assistant Vice Chancellor for Diversity, Engagement and Student Success at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. He returned to UW-Madison in 2019 to become the Associate Dean of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion at the School of Education.

Charleston says he wants students to feel comfortable finding themselves fully in the spaces they inhabit. He intends to lead by example.

“What people need to know about me is that I’m a pure and tough, born and raised Detroit resident,” he says. “A lot of who I am comes from my parents, my grandmother and my siblings and the blue collar values ​​they instilled in me. They helped me prepare for this moment.

Charleston played Division I football and sings in Kinfolk, a local soul and R&B group. He enjoys boating, kayaking, biking and motorcycling. His wife, Sherri Ann Charleston, is his “No. 1 colleague and thinking partner, ”he says. She is responsible for diversity and inclusion at Harvard University.

Cheryl Gittens has been Acting Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Head of Diversity since July 2020, having served as Deputy Vice-Chancellor at DDEEA.

“Dr. Gittens has done an outstanding job leading our diversity and inclusion efforts through an incredibly difficult and challenging time in our company and on our campus,” said Rector Karl Scholz. “We are in a more challenging position. strong thanks to his commitment to this institution, and I wish to express my deep gratitude for his work over the past year. ”

Jerlando FL Jackson chaired the 14-member search and screen committee. He is Vilas Professor of Higher Education Emeritus, Director of the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis, and Director and Chief Researcher of Wei LAB.

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Controversy over the Critical Carmel Race Theory: A Timeline https://divegearjp.com/controversy-over-the-critical-carmel-race-theory-a-timeline/ https://divegearjp.com/controversy-over-the-critical-carmel-race-theory-a-timeline/#respond Tue, 22 Jun 2021 10:12:42 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/controversy-over-the-critical-carmel-race-theory-a-timeline/ From marathon public comment sessions in Westfield to hundreds of people gathered with signs in Carmel, schools’ diversity, equity and inclusion efforts are in the spotlight in suburban Hamilton County. While this work is not new, there is a growing interest in the community in what educators are doing when it comes to diversity, equity […]]]>

From marathon public comment sessions in Westfield to hundreds of people gathered with signs in Carmel, schools’ diversity, equity and inclusion efforts are in the spotlight in suburban Hamilton County.

While this work is not new, there is a growing interest in the community in what educators are doing when it comes to diversity, equity and inclusion, or DCI, especially after last summer. It was at this point that the police murders of blacks pushed conversations about race to the fore across the country.

As district leaders navigated the school during a pandemic, they also strived to make the school inclusive and equitable through programs, resources, data analytics, and more. Several districts have hired equity leaders.

Critical breed theory: Hamilton County schools don’t teach it, but it still irritates some parents

What is Critical Race Theory

The CRT examines systemic racism within the framework of American life and institutions and how it can give whites an advantage.

Erin Davoran and Dwight Adams, Wochit

In the communities, new organizations were formed aimed at empowering the districts. And school board meetings got louder and longer as parents and community members spoke out for both support and opposition to IEI’s efforts.

June 2021

June 15: Parents talk about issues of transparency, critical breed theory and more at a Noblesville school board meeting. Members of the public also shouted and made comments during the meeting, prompting Superintendent Beth Niedermeyer to ask them to be respectful.

June 9: During public comments at a Hamilton Southeastern School Board meeting, several speakers raised concerns about transparency, critical race theory, and socio-emotional learning (SEL). HSE School Board President Janet Pritchett underlines the district’s dedication to SEL and DCI, sparking public outcry.

May 2021

May 17: As Carmel Schools’ diversity efforts continue, supporters, many of whom are students, speak at a school board meeting. Hundreds of people gather outside ahead of the meeting with more support for DCI than opponents.

May 13: Noblesville Schools collect feedback on diversity efforts at the first of four community meetings. Here’s what happens next.

May 11: After meetings where public comment lasted for hours, the Westfield Washington School Board said public comment would only be on agenda items. There are no public commentators.

May 4: Parents in Noblesville are protesting how schools talk about racism before and during a school board meeting.

May 3: Noblesville Schools Announce Community Meeting on Diversity Work, via email.

A crowd begins to gather ahead of the Carmel Clay School Board meeting on May 17, 2021. This group carried signs in support of DCI’s work in the district.
MJ Slaby / IndyStar

April 2021

April: Unify Carmel Forms after several people spoke to the school board about their concerns about DCI’s work. The organization says it wants to restore academic excellence, hold the school board accountable and transparent to all parents and “ensure parental control over academic decisions, in order to achieve academic excellence.”

April 26: At a school board meeting, parents criticize the diversity work of Carmel Clay Schools, calling it divisive and political. After the public comments, DCI agent Terri Roberts-Leonard provided an update to the board.

April 22: HSE hires Yvonne Stokes as the next superintendent, and she is the district’s first black superintendent. The board vote on his hiring is 5-2 and the protesters are outside.

April 20: A heated debate continues over the school library’s gender identity books in Westfield, with public commentary spanning hours.

April 20: In a morning work session, Nataki Pettigrew, Head of Equity and Inclusion HSE, provides an update on DCI at the HSE School Board. Later that day, the district sends out a statement regarding the verdict of the Derek Chauvin trial. The email acknowledged that there was racial trauma from the trial and that there was still work to be done to have a fair and equitable community and school district.

A protester holds a sign outside a building as the Noblesville School Board meets indoors on Tuesday, May 4, 2021. Protesters, who were unwilling to provide their names, said they didn't want schools to teach critical race theory, a concept that examines systemic racism as part of American life.  The district said it does not teach critical breed theory.

March 2021

March: Two new organizations are forming this month. Unify Westfield is created after several parents spoke to the school board. The organization says it seeks “transparency, respect for parental authority and the creation of a school culture centered on what unites us rather than divides us”.

Fishers One is also forming with the goal of “keeping people informed while restoring academic excellence in our schools, holding elected officials accountable, keeping Fishers a great place to live and training the next generation of leaders.” “.

March 29: After a debate over books on gender identity, Westfield schools are considering new policies relating to books and resources used in schools.

March 24: HSE Superintendent Allen Bourff said the Racial Justice Town Hall was a success and the district will plan more.

March 23: HSE has a Virtual Town Hall on Racial Justice.

March 9: Westfield parents debate elementary school access to gender identity books at a school board meeting.

March 4: After the Black Lives Matter letters spark an uproar, HSE schools propose a town hall for racial justice.

February 2021

February 10: With a protest outside, the HSE school board is making two different statements about Black Lives Matter.

February 9: The HSE Superintendent’s mixed messages on Black Lives Matter leave the community hurt and confused. Bourff apologized for the letter to the faculty with a second letter.

February 8: HSE Superintendent Bourff says to teach Black Lives Matter as a policy, later apologizes.

Lousie Jackson is sworn in as the new member of the Carmel Clay School Board on Monday, January 11, 2021 at the Carmel Clay District Office in Carmel Ind.

Lousie Jackson is sworn in as the new member of the Carmel Clay School Board on Monday, January 11, 2021 at the Carmel Clay District Office in Carmel Ind.
Grace Hollars / IndyStar

January 2021

January 19: Nataki Pettigrew begins as Equity and Inclusion Manager at HSE.

January 19: Terri Roberts-Leonard began as a DCI officer at Carmel Clay Schools.

January 13: HSE appoints new Director of Equity and Inclusion.

January 11: Louise Jackson, who is the first black member of the Carmel School Board, is sworn in.

2020

December 14: Carmel Clay Schools Hires First District Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Officer.

November 2: Noblesville Schools are hiring an Equity and Inclusion Officer for the District.

June: Two organizations are formed this month. Racial Equity Allied Communities (first named Carmel Against Racial Injustice) focus on education, community and policing reform. In the area of ​​education, the organization wants schools to be a safe place for all students and uses education to prevent racial discrimination.

The Westfield Parents for Change forms focus on “eliminating and preventing systemic racism in the schools of Westfield Washington, our city, township institutions and in the hearts of the residents of Westfield”. The organization said it was working with “employees, administrators and policy makers to help create an environment where Westfield students and residents feel safe, included and cared for.”

June 4: Carmel Superintendent Michael Beresford sends an email saying it is “difficult to understand the murder of George Floyd”. He urges the community not to “keep silent in the face of the suffering of others” and stresses that the district is committed to inclusiveness.

June 3: Noblesville Superintendent Niedermeyer sends email after “recent tragic death of George Floyd and other black Americans”. She writes that educators must be leaders in helping “break down systems that perpetuate inequality, injustice and racism” and emphasizes the district’s commitment to racial equity.

June 2: Then-superintendent Sherry Grate sends email noting that the district is looking for ways to teach students to “stand up against injustice, racism and inequity” after watching calls for “justice and tie after the murder of George Floyd “. She urged the community to come together for conversations.

May 30: Superintendent HSE Bourff sends email in response to the “harsh reality of lives lost – not only from the global pandemic, but also from racially motivated violence.” He wrote that “we must stand together against injustice, racism and violence” and underlined HSE’s commitment to all students.

Call IndyStar Education Reporter MJ Slaby at 317-447-1586 or email him at mslaby@gannett.com. Follow her on Twitter: @mjslaby.

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Where is the diversity in our creative class? https://divegearjp.com/where-is-the-diversity-in-our-creative-class/ https://divegearjp.com/where-is-the-diversity-in-our-creative-class/#respond Tue, 22 Jun 2021 10:00:02 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/where-is-the-diversity-in-our-creative-class/ National Geographic Editor-in-chief Susan Goldberg recently raised her eyebrows by adding the words “white, privileged, with much to learn” to her electronic signature. The self-flagellating mass email was part of a “race map project” that encouraged readers to submit “six-word race micro-essays.” Ms. Goldberg’s signature line is not an outlier. I know this because I […]]]>

National Geographic Editor-in-chief Susan Goldberg recently raised her eyebrows by adding the words “white, privileged, with much to learn” to her electronic signature. The self-flagellating mass email was part of a “race map project” that encouraged readers to submit “six-word race micro-essays.”

Ms. Goldberg’s signature line is not an outlier. I know this because I have lived in this media environment for 13 years, covering travel, sports, and a host of culture and lifestyle rhythms for dozens of national and regional media outlets. I’ve never been a fan of Donald Trump, but my views are conservative enough to be considered heretics in this island world of social justice warriors inhabiting Brooklyn and declaring pronouns.

Even so, I hadn’t realized just how pervasive liberal group thinking was until this year, when I researched hundreds of potential media targets to review a pair of travel books that I did. had just published. While none of my potential targets covered politics, it often took only seconds to scan social media profiles to determine that the influencers I needed on my end were almost uniformly progressive Democrats. Their public statements read like an interchangeable bag of virtue signals and buzzwords about gay pride, BLM, the evils of Trumpism, and other buzzwords.

Diversity is like worship for these people, but in terms of thoughts and values, diversity is not their strength. Dissenters and free thinkers were once popular in America, but today oppressive conformism is the golden rule for our media class. In my research, I came across a single writer with overtly conservative leanings. Of course, there are plenty of other conservative writers and editors who work for center-right publications. But these publications tend to cover books on politics. When was the last time you read a travel book review on Foxnews.com?

In North Korea, a person hair bun, or social class, determines their fate in life. There are 55 subclasses and three main classes: the middle class – made up of party faithful – the hesitant class and the hostile class. Our creative class is made up almost exclusively of party loyalists (Democrats). Those, like me, with bad hair bun are part of the hostile class. We can exist and maybe even thrive, but only inside conservative bird cages, where we are allowed to chirp to like-minded heretics.

It is impossible to calculate the impact of my bad hair bun or the fact that my books were published by Post Hill Press, which has a number of prominent curators in its stable of authors. After agree to publish a book by Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly, a police officer involved in the Breonna Taylor shooting, more than 200 Simon & Schuster employees signed a petition imploring the company to end its distribution deal with Post Hill and cancel a book deal with former vice president Mike Pence.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg appears on a screen behind a stenographer as he testifies remotely at the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation hearing “Section 230 sweep immunity allows it a bad behavior of big technologies? Washington DC. Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey; CEO of Alphabet Inc. and its subsidiary Google LLC, Sundar Pichai; and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg all testified virtually at the hearing. Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act ensures that tech companies cannot be sued for content on their platforms, but the Justice Department has suggested limiting this legislation.
Michael Reynolds-Pool / Getty Images

Rather than relying on the basic media class to publicize my most recent book, Crazy travelers, I tried to go straight to readers with ads on Facebook and Instagram. But Facebook permanently suspended me from advertising on its platforms, even though my ad submissions contained little more than images of book covers. A Facebook supervisor shared 13 “possible reasons” for my ban, including vague offenses such as “violations of community standards”, “suspicious activity” and the promotion of websites or links that do not “conform” to the guidelines. Facebook policies.

There is no allusion to politics in any of my books and, in fact, I never comment on politics on social media or even post links to articles I write about politics. There might be a bureaucratic reason why I can’t advertise, but given Big Tech’s censorship of conservatives, I can’t help but wonder if I’ve landed on a class blacklist. hostile.

Carrying my story straight to bookstores was equally frustrating. Booksellers tend to be just as liberal as their media cousins. A bookstore where I was scheduled to lecture on a book, which displays a BLM sign and has a decidedly left-facing inventory, canceled my book launch event after my editor made headlines for Sgt. Mattingly’s book. A day later, he invited me back, explaining that canceling me was a “hot” overreaction. I appreciated their change of mind, but it was clear that the apolitical nature of my books was the only reason I was spared the literary guillotine.

After Crazy travelers came out with a bang, my wife asked me if maybe I should have stayed in the (conservative) closet. I have given the matter some thought and even buried some potentially offensive articles from my website. Maybe I could be rehabilitated, maybe even spend a day in base class, spread my pronouns, diligently condemn my own white privilege, and repeat the (Democratic) party talking points on voter suppression. , reinvent the police and help immigrants come out of the shadows.

Thank you but, no thank you. I prefer to be an outsider swimming against the tide, even if it means selling fewer books. Compliance stifles creativity. Liberals gleefully boycott those who violate their ideological safe spaces, but choice-hungry conservatives are used to condescending content creators regardless of their policies. Being conservative comes at a cost, but waking up is essentially free.

Young people spend hours every day on screens, ingesting content produced and curated almost exclusively by liberals. They won’t encounter conservative views unless they actively seek them out, a task made more difficult by Big Tech. The culture of a nation defines its policy. The right cannot just focus on politics, polls and elections. Conservatives are now mostly spectators, standing outside the arena, watching our culture drift to the left, complaining about each other and doing nothing about it. Like-minded hostile class members can disrupt the left-wing cultural cartel and fight Big Tech censorship, but only if we stop censoring ourselves and make our voices heard.

Dave Seminara is the author of Crazy Travelers: A Tale of Wanderlust, Greed & the Quest to Reach the Ends of the Earth and In the footsteps of Federer: a pilgrimage of fans through 7 Swiss cantons in 10 acts.

The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author.

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Corporate America has a supplier diversity issue https://divegearjp.com/corporate-america-has-a-supplier-diversity-issue/ https://divegearjp.com/corporate-america-has-a-supplier-diversity-issue/#respond Tue, 22 Jun 2021 09:58:30 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/corporate-america-has-a-supplier-diversity-issue/ There have been new discussions about increasing diversity in spaces beyond the simple common office, such as in corporate boardrooms, among recruiters, and even within corporate incentive structures. But there is another part of the private sector that could be left behind in all of these discussions – supplier diversity. As a result of the […]]]>

There have been new discussions about increasing diversity in spaces beyond the simple common office, such as in corporate boardrooms, among recruiters, and even within corporate incentive structures.

But there is another part of the private sector that could be left behind in all of these discussions – supplier diversity.

As a result of the civil rights movement of the 1960s, special programs emerged aimed at connecting large companies with more diverse suppliers, usually small companies owned primarily by people from under-represented groups. , such as minorities, women, people with disabilities, LGBTQ entrepreneurs, etc.

Unfortunately, diversity among vendors within U.S. companies is still low and appears to lack the support of the private or public sector, according to Kelly Burton, executive director of Black innovation alliance and founder of the Nexus Research Group consulting firm.

“While the vast majority of businesses and government agencies rely on vendor diversity to find diverse vendors, the model doesn’t work at all,” Burton said in an interview with the host of “Marketplace Morning Report” , David Brancaccio.

Below is an edited transcript of their discussion of low vendor diversity, why current programs and models to increase vendor diversity aren’t working, and what could be done to address a neglected issue.

David Brancaccio: Where does the company you do business get from? This is a key question. And in the quest to tackle systemic racism in this country, there is a new emphasis on what’s called supply chain diversity. Dr Burton, can you give me a better idea of ​​what this means? It’s about where the company you’re doing business with gets its products from, right?

Dr Kelly Burton, Executive Director of Black Innovation Alliance

Kelly Burton: Supplier diversity programs are therefore the primary means by which businesses and government agencies seek out various companies with which to do business. It is a model that was created under the Nixon administration as a result of the civil rights movement to combat racial discrimination in shopping and has since been opened to include women, LGBTQ, veterans, individuals with disabilities and even small businesses. So in the diversity model, supplier diversity, all of these groups are considered disadvantaged groups.

Brancaccio: And I would like to say, “And that’s perfect in every way, and the problem has been solved.” And you’re going to say “No” to me.

Burton: If only, if only. While the vast majority of businesses and government agencies rely on supplier diversity to find diverse suppliers, the model does not work well at all. On average, just 10% of business spending is with disadvantaged groups, meaning the amount of spending with businesses run and owned by people of color tends to hover between the numbers. So for American companies it’s less than 5%, and for government procurement it’s around 2%, which is appalling considering the fact that people of color make up 39% of the total. American population.

Brancaccio: Yes, and based on your research, in your interactions, do you find that the companies that buy have everything to heart?

Burton: It’s difficult. What we do know is that, in general, these programs are neither well funded nor well supported. Supplier diversity professionals struggle to gain inter-organizational buy-in from managers and senior executives. According to a study, 54% of companies dedicate an employee or less to supplier diversity. So it’s hard to say you’re supporting something when you can’t even devote a full-time body to it.

Brancaccio: And that’s where leadership could come in, isn’t it? If the boss, if the CEO and his assistants make this a priority, things magically start to change.

Burton: Indeed, and we need more business leaders to step up and call for reform. But the challenge is that American companies are heavily invested in this system. This has been the way things have been going for over 50 years. And even though it’s pretty broken, it’s very difficult for American businesses to change.

Brancaccio: If a person wants to be a supplier in this complicated system, they often need the credentials, right? And can this system itself be a barrier?

Burton: Absolutely. More than 70% of companies rely on certification bodies. These are entities that essentially task small business owners with certifying that their business is more than 51% owned by a member of a disadvantaged group. Unfortunately, certification bodies tend to certify less than 1% of the diverse supplier universe. And so, in many ways, companies are cut off from the vast majority of suppliers and high potential companies that could potentially support their work and wish they could do business.

Brancaccio: And overall, it’s not just about getting more companies thinking, where do we source from? Are our suppliers more diverse? You want them to thrive. This is what the end goal of this policy was designed to meet.

Burton: Absolutely yes. You want them to be successful and you want them to be successful. But what we find is that more often than not these various companies don’t even get a chance. The system just isn’t necessarily set up so that they can even access these opportunities. Much of the sourcing is relationship based. And women and people of color have not had the opportunity to accumulate the kind of social capital that our white male counterparts have been able to accumulate over generations.

Brancaccio: Social capital, like a larger network, so that you know the right person to land the contract?

Burton: It’s exactly that. And so supplier diversity is supposed to be designed to create entry points, but in many ways it creates additional barriers as people of color have to go through extra steps that our white male counterparts don’t necessarily have. to cross.

Brancaccio: So what would you do? Would you rethink the system put in place during the [Richard] The Nixon administration? Does he need something structural?

Burton: Absolutely. And I submit that it would be completely reinvented. A lot of times we like to think, well, the system is down, so let’s fix the system. I think we just need an entirely different system, designed for a modern age, designed to solve the problem of lack of access to opportunities for entrepreneurs and business owners of color.

Brancaccio: Once people start talking, where do you go from there to rethink this whole idea of ​​supplier diversity?

Burton: We need more corporate leadership. We need more leaders in corporate America to say, “You know what? The system is broken. And we have to reinvent the way we do it better. This won’t happen until companies decide it needs to be done. The challenge we see is that entrepreneurs and small business owners, for the most part, are unorganized. So they don’t have much power in this conversation. So it could be a “both and” where we’re talking about empowering small business owners and entrepreneurs of color. And at the same time, getting more business leaders, both supplier diversity professionals and business leaders, to say, “You know what? Two percent is not enough. Five percent is not enough. We have to take it to the next level and we have to design the kind of system and model that will allow us to do that.

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Develop an intentional and integrated diversity and inclusion program https://divegearjp.com/develop-an-intentional-and-integrated-diversity-and-inclusion-program/ https://divegearjp.com/develop-an-intentional-and-integrated-diversity-and-inclusion-program/#respond Tue, 22 Jun 2021 09:00:00 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/develop-an-intentional-and-integrated-diversity-and-inclusion-program/ For over 130 years, Sentara Healthcare has served some of the most diverse communities in Virginia and North Carolina. We believe our differences are our strengths and as a result we are always proud of our equally diverse teams and the work we do within our communities. In mid-2019, we decided to formalize our commitment […]]]>

For over 130 years, Sentara Healthcare has served some of the most diverse communities in Virginia and North Carolina. We believe our differences are our strengths and as a result we are always proud of our equally diverse teams and the work we do within our communities.

In mid-2019, we decided to formalize our commitment by intentionally fostering a culture of inclusion, creating a Diversity and Inclusion Program led by our Senior Director of Diversity, Dana Beckton. We have also defined our strategy to have an impact on everyone who interacts with Sentara.

Here are some examples of our early work:

  • Forming essential partnerships to maximize community impact. This includes partnering with the local community and religious leaders to provide free services and educational opportunities to people in underserved communities.
  • Establish diversity councils in our 12 hospitals chaired by hospital presidents, as well as a system-wide diversity executive council chaired by Sentara President and CEO Howard P. Kern.
  • Implement internal policies and procedures to protect and support LGBTQ employees and patients, and support them with leadership training.
  • Develop a series of “Safe Space” virtual internal conversations that allow employees to learn, discuss and ask questions, without judgment, about sensitive issues that affect them at work and at home.

The goal was to get full membership. When leaders view diversity and inclusion as a facet of the organization’s overall strategy and goals rather than the responsibility of an individual or team, they create accountability and shape a culture that enables this organization to thrive.

It’s also important to understand our workforce, our workplace and our organizational culture to create a solid foundation on which to build. This understanding helped identify where we could have the most impact.

These and other efforts have produced immediate and tangible results.

In 2020, the 12 Sentara hospitals were awarded the title of “Leader in LGBTQ Health Equality” as part of the Human Rights Campaign’s Health Equality Index. Forbes named Sentara the best employer for women in 2020.

The pandemic has highlighted significant inequalities within our diverse communities and created an opportunity to further address these issues. Our partnerships with key community organizations have enabled us to administer over 15,000 free COVID-19 tests over six months and over 69,000 COVID-19 vaccines to patients and community members between January 20 and April 12. 2021.

These partnerships also provided 100,000 boxes of food and a pilot education program for underemployed people. We hope the pilot program will remove barriers and create pathways to healthcare and other skilled career opportunities for a more diverse workforce.

Our Safe Space conversations have become a trusted channel for employees to engage in difficult discussions. The first sessions focused on George Floyd and police violence. We also held sessions focused on myths and sources of mistrust of COVID-19 vaccines. Hundreds of employees attend these sessions, where they can listen to trusted voices discuss the topic, ask questions in a chat, and get honest answers in real time. We are currently preparing sessions on the continuation of social unrest and acts of violence.

However, more important than celebrating our early successes is our commitment to sustaining and developing them. Diversity and inclusion is not a goal. It is an ongoing effort for the best and for more, for everyone, whether they work for Sentara, receive care from Sentara, or live in the neighborhoods we serve. As we look to the future, it is clear that our successes will continue to stem from intentional and culturally ingrained strategies that amplify diverse voices within and outside our walls.

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Asifa Lahore on School Diversity Week, The Importance of Inclusiveness and the Power of Drag https://divegearjp.com/asifa-lahore-on-school-diversity-week-the-importance-of-inclusiveness-and-the-power-of-drag/ https://divegearjp.com/asifa-lahore-on-school-diversity-week-the-importance-of-inclusiveness-and-the-power-of-drag/#respond Tue, 22 Jun 2021 06:00:00 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/asifa-lahore-on-school-diversity-week-the-importance-of-inclusiveness-and-the-power-of-drag/ Ask Asifa Lahore to introduce herself and she will tell you that she ranks as “an intersectional and unique person”. “I’m an LGBT + activist and I live my life as a trans woman,” she tells me via Zoom from her home in south-east London. “Previously, I lived my life as a gay man, then […]]]>

Ask Asifa Lahore to introduce herself and she will tell you that she ranks as “an intersectional and unique person”.

“I’m an LGBT + activist and I live my life as a trans woman,” she tells me via Zoom from her home in south-east London. “Previously, I lived my life as a gay man, then I was very publicly transgender during my drag career, and I live with a disability, being severely visually impaired. I am very proud of who I am and what I have accomplished so far in my 38 years on this planet.

It’s her experience as a prominent member of the UK’s queer activist infrastructure – constantly challenging the misrepresentation of queer, Muslim and South Asian communities across the country – and her ability to communicate that makes her the perfect ambassador for Just Like Us School Diversity Week. The annual event promotes inclusion in an educational setting, seeking to make schools safer and more welcoming to students who are part of the LGBTQ + community. “I am truly honored to participate and to be able to share my experiences with young people,” Lahore tells me.

We meet (virtually) before her masterclass on June 24 to discuss the importance of reaching out, the urgency of inclusiveness, and the power of flirting.

Erkan Affan: Thank you for taking the time Asifa, I want to start by asking you about this label which has been awarded to you as the “first Muslim drag queen” in UK. How do you feel and what kind of attention do you receive with it?

Asifa Lahore: From my own experiences of clubbing as a teenager and being in the scene for over 15 years, I know Britain has had a strong queer Muslim and queer South Asian scene since the 1980s. So I am very aware of my own history and of the queens that came before me.

However, when I first went out publicly, many of these performers weren’t known to the general public and stepped out of the spotlight for fear of the treatment they would receive. And so being labeled as the first Muslim drag queen “to come out” probably comes from my decision to put my head above the parapet, so to speak.

I remember when I started playing around 2011, I was cataloged. People wouldn’t understand my drag because they couldn’t relate to my jokes, or they found it controversial that there could be a Muslim drag queen working in the circuits. But I never thought about stopping, so I became an activist without apologizing – but also reluctantly, raising my voice and fighting for my recognition as a Muslim drag queen. Now, looking at social media in 2021, I’m happy to see a plethora of brown, Muslim and queer art and activism globally.

EA: Tell me a bit about how you got involved in School Diversity Week and what impact do you hope it will have?

AL: I went to school for the article 28 era in the late 1990s. I suffered a lot of bullying and, because of Article 28, teachers could not intervene for fear of “promoting homosexuality”. So I endured the trauma of shame, anger and loneliness until I was able to cope with it through therapy and healthy relationships in my twenties.

All of this meant that when I was approached about School Diversity Week, I jumped at the chance to tell my story. Through my identities as Muslim, British, Pakistani, South Asian, queer, transgender and disabled, I try to convey to people that we all have different angles in our experiences and that these are acceptable. It is getting better and school is not a reflection of what your whole life will be like.

EA: What do you think are the best ways for young people to connect with others like them and to get out of the difficulties they face in school?

AL: There are a lot of services available now, especially with the Internet. There is Imaan, NAZ Project, Hidaya, there is an LGBT Sikh charity called Sarbat, I know that there is LGBT Jewish Services And much more. You are not alone, because someone has already experienced what you are going through and you don’t have to do it yourself. It just takes courage. The first step is the most difficult. There are so many other relationships to be had, families to be created.

EA: You mentioned courage, and I want to know how your work gave you the courage that you have today?

AL: Well, drag has really empowered me in two very different ways. In my teenage years, I was afraid to pursue a career in the performing arts for fear of being exposed. Drag was an opportunity for me to perform again, it became the ultimate expression. I was playing with the utmost glamor, femininity, and all the people who had demeaned me during my teenage years and rejected me for my homosexuality and / or my brown color no longer mattered. Second, when I started to put on makeup and try on what is considered “women’s clothing,” something inside me clicked. The dresses looked like a hand putting on a glove. The flirting led to my reconciliation with my trans identity, allowing me to start all over again. It gave me my life and I wouldn’t change it. For me, it’s a full-fledged self-expression with no excuses.

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Whitehall embraces diversity and re-commits to inclusion https://divegearjp.com/whitehall-embraces-diversity-and-re-commits-to-inclusion/ https://divegearjp.com/whitehall-embraces-diversity-and-re-commits-to-inclusion/#respond Tue, 22 Jun 2021 02:41:48 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/whitehall-embraces-diversity-and-re-commits-to-inclusion/ Despite the challenges of the past 18 months, the story of Whitehall’s comeback continues on strong. As our community progresses, we face a number of changes including new services and programs, new businesses, new housing and often new neighbors. As we look to the future and embrace these changes, I encourage each of us to […]]]>

Despite the challenges of the past 18 months, the story of Whitehall’s comeback continues on strong.

As our community progresses, we face a number of changes including new services and programs, new businesses, new housing and often new neighbors.

As we look to the future and embrace these changes, I encourage each of us to reflect on how we treat and welcome each other as equal members of a growing community, be it the way. from which we receive new neighbors, develop relationships with passing acquaintances or continue to foster long-standing friendships.

Something that makes Whitehall unique is the rich diversity that exists here, with members of our community coming from all walks of life, representing a range of racial, cultural, religious, gender and gender identities. More than most of the suburban areas of central Ohio, we truly are a melting pot, and I believe with all my heart that is to our credit.

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Tucker: In Don Lemon’s spare time, he shuns diversity https://divegearjp.com/tucker-in-don-lemons-spare-time-he-shuns-diversity/ https://divegearjp.com/tucker-in-don-lemons-spare-time-he-shuns-diversity/#respond Tue, 22 Jun 2021 02:04:02 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/tucker-in-don-lemons-spare-time-he-shuns-diversity/ Fox News host Tucker Carlson called out what appears to be a “racist cookie jar” in CNN host Don Lemon’s kitchen during Monday’s “Tucker Carlson Tonight” show. CARLSON: Mr. Don Lemon is a cable news host on our competitor CNN, and most of the time he talks about cable news host type things: what the […]]]>

Fox News host Tucker Carlson called out what appears to be a “racist cookie jar” in CNN host Don Lemon’s kitchen during Monday’s “Tucker Carlson Tonight” show.

CARLSON: Mr. Don Lemon is a cable news host on our competitor CNN, and most of the time he talks about cable news host type things: what the Royals do, how a commercial airliner could have soared into a black hole, you know, the news. But Don Lemon is above all more than that. Don Lemon is a civil rights leader. The other day he spoke to the “Washington Post” about his feelings on civil rights, and he said, you might not be surprised by this, that America is a racist country.

Quote: “We live in two different realities as black and white,” said Father Lemon.

Don Lemon lives in a $ 4.3 million home in Sag Harbor, New York. No, he doesn’t live in Section 8 housing, he lives in one of the whitest cities in America. In fact, at 80% Sag Harbor is only 3% African American. In the interview, Mr. Lemon said America needs to see more people like him. He regularly lectures America on diversity. When he didn’t tell the Washington Post, it’s because in his spare time he shuns diversity.

Now we’re not calling that to be a white supremacist here, but you must be wondering, and I’m going to put that on screen now. What is that symbol of hate masquerading as a cookie jar, doing in Don Lemon’s kitchen?

Do you see this? Here is, ladies and gentlemen, a white supremacist, QAnon, a cookie jar. Now we are not calling on the Department of Justice to dig deeper into the matter because it is not our place, we are a cable news show and not a law enforcement agency. But let’s put it this way, if you find yourself with a black faced cookie jar in your own kitchen, it’s time to think it over. That means you, Don Lemon.

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