Diving Sport – Dive Gear JP http://divegearjp.com/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 06:27:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://divegearjp.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon.png Diving Sport – Dive Gear JP http://divegearjp.com/ 32 32 BOYS SWIMMING AND DIVING: Bemidji perseveres during a week off – Bemidji Pioneer https://divegearjp.com/boys-swimming-and-diving-bemidji-perseveres-during-a-week-off-bemidji-pioneer/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 03:17:00 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/boys-swimming-and-diving-bemidji-perseveres-during-a-week-off-bemidji-pioneer/ BEMIDJI – A week off in the middle of a season is disruptive to most sports. But for swimming and diving, it can be catastrophic. “There was a lot of anxiety (from) some of our top guys.” said Woody Leindecker, co-coach of the Bemidji High School Boys. And if we had been out of the […]]]>

BEMIDJI – A week off in the middle of a season is disruptive to most sports. But for swimming and diving, it can be catastrophic.

“There was a lot of anxiety (from) some of our top guys.” said Woody Leindecker, co-coach of the Bemidji High School Boys. And if we had been out of the water for nine days, which would have been the total, their season would have been over.

The loggers were prevented from using their original facility due to the decision of schools in the Bemidji area to cancel all schools and activities from January 18-22 due to COVID-19 cases and others. diseases affecting the district workforce.

Instead, BHS traveled to Fosston and Park Rapids to keep fit. It paid off when they were able to return home on Monday, notably with a meeting against Sartell-St. Stefan on Tuesday.

Bemidji senior Max Brown takes a breather in the 500 yard freestyle against Sartell-St. Stephen on Tuesday, January 25, 2022 at Bemidji High School.

Jillian Gandsey / Bemidji Pioneer

“In this sport, a conditioning sport, it takes forever to get (conditioned) and it doesn’t take long to lose it,” Leindecker said. “And that’s what we were looking for.”

The Jacks dropped the competition to the mighty Sabres, losing 110-57 to the BHS pool. But it was more important for the swimmers in Bemidji that they had the opportunity to maintain their stamina and continue to compete as the section meet approached.

“Coming back to our pool has been a real blessing,” said junior Walker Erickson. “It was so nice to finally swim in our pool.”

Erickson had the best day of any lumberjack, finishing first in the 100-yard breaststroke with a time of 1:10.21 and the 50-yard freestyle with a time of 23.65. He also joined Brooks Matetich, Moses Son and Aidan Wolf to lead the 200-yard freestyle relay in 1:34.67, three hundredths of a second faster than the runners-up.

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Bemidji senior Brooks Matetich swims the 100-yard butterfly against Sartell-St. Stephen on Tuesday, January 25, 2022 at Bemidji High School.

Jillian Gandsey / Bemidji Pioneer

Matetich was second in the 200 IM (2:16.15) and 100 butterfly (59.25). He joined Erickson, Son and Wolf to finish second in the 400 freestyle relay clocking 3:37.28.

Max Brown, Hudson Hanschen, Nick Carlson and Noah Gustafson completed Bemidji’s first two results with a second to last place in the 200 medley relay (2:23.48).

Erickson noted how practicing in unfamiliar pools has forced the Jacks to repeatedly adapt their training, as the idiosyncrasies of each pool are different.

“It was a real struggle not to have the same pool that we’re used to,” Erickson said. “We had to train elsewhere, and their pools were very different. Lighting is an important factor for your mentality and the way you run in general. And sometimes the middle (of the lane) is not where it normally is.

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Bemidji senior Noah Gustafson swims his length of the 200-yard medley relay against Sartell-St. Stephen on Tuesday, January 25, 2022 at Bemidji High School.

Jillian Gandsey / Bemidji Pioneer

BHS faced a sub-optimal situation with only one home training before facing Sartell-St. Stephane. The Lumberjacks can’t wait to have their favorite pool to practice on going forward.

“It was really tough to do one practice and come back to it,” Erickson said. “And that really shows how important training is, even if it’s not in the same pool. It really sets your standards for where you will be and where you could be.

As Bemidji prepares for the Feb. 25 sections, the Jacks are just hoping they can practice uninterrupted as they prepare to taper and cut their time.

“(Our outlook is) good, as long as we can stay and have no more interruptions,” Leindecker said. “We had a mixed bag tonight. You could tell some guys were a little rusty.

Bemidji returns to competition against Sauk Center/Melrose at 6 p.m. on Friday, January 28, returning to the BHS Pool.

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The Lumberjacks cheer in the 500-yard freestyle against Sartell-St. Stephen on Tuesday, January 25, 2022 at Bemidji High School.

Jillian Gandsey / Bemidji Pioneer

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Bemidji Senior Aidan Wolf applauds a team mate during a game against Sartell-St. Stephen on Tuesday, January 25, 2022 at Bemidji High School.

Jillian Gandsey / Bemidji Pioneer

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FINA postpones 2022 World Championships held in Fukuoka due to COVID-19 – Sport https://divegearjp.com/fina-postpones-2022-world-championships-held-in-fukuoka-due-to-covid-19-sport/ Mon, 24 Jan 2022 12:36:38 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/fina-postpones-2022-world-championships-held-in-fukuoka-due-to-covid-19-sport/ MOSCOW, January 24. /TASS/. The 2022 World Championships in Fukuoka, Japan have been postponed to 2023 due to COVID-19, the President of the Swimming Federation of Russia and member of the Bureau of the International Swimming Federation (FINA) Vladimir Salnikov has said. at TASS. Originally, the world championships were scheduled to be held from July […]]]>

MOSCOW, January 24. /TASS/. The 2022 World Championships in Fukuoka, Japan have been postponed to 2023 due to COVID-19, the President of the Swimming Federation of Russia and member of the Bureau of the International Swimming Federation (FINA) Vladimir Salnikov has said. at TASS.

Originally, the world championships were scheduled to be held from July 16 to August 1, 2021. Due to the postponement of the Tokyo Olympics, the world aquatics championships were scheduled for May 13 to 29, 2022.

“The FINA office met on Friday and voted to postpone the World Championships to 2023 due to the pandemic and other issues related to the organization of the arrival and accommodation of participants in the “coronavirus environment. No alternative options for the World Championships were presented,” Salnikov said.

Salnikov explained that the exact dates for the World Championships in 2023 have yet to be determined. The world championship in 2023 was to be held in Doha. In 2025, the tournament will be held in Kazan.

At the World Aquatic Championships, contenders compete for medals in swimming, diving, high diving, water polo and synchronized swimming. The last world championship was held in 2019 in Gwangju, South Korea.

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NCAA’s “Sport-by-Sport Approach to Transgender Participation” Sparks Debate | Sports https://divegearjp.com/ncaas-sport-by-sport-approach-to-transgender-participation-sparks-debate-sports/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 21:39:36 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/ncaas-sport-by-sport-approach-to-transgender-participation-sparks-debate-sports/ A new NCAA policy allowing each sport’s national governing body to determine the eligibility of transgender athletes has come under fire from observers on different sides of a highly charged debate over college sports participation. The policy, announced Wednesday night, comes as University of Pennsylvania swimmer Lia Thomas – who is due to compete at […]]]>

A new NCAA policy allowing each sport’s national governing body to determine the eligibility of transgender athletes has come under fire from observers on different sides of a highly charged debate over college sports participation.

The policy, announced Wednesday night, comes as University of Pennsylvania swimmer Lia Thomas – who is due to compete at Harvard University on Saturday – is setting record times on the women’s team this season. She had previously competed on Penn’s men’s swim team and had undergone two years of hormone therapy.

Now, Thomas is being hailed as one of the top female collegiate swimmers in the nation, her rapid success drawing both praise and criticism in the swimming world.

Transgender athletes will now have mandatory testosterone testing beginning in the 2022-23 academic year — at the start of their season and again six months later, under rules approved this week by the NCAA Board of Governors. In addition, they will have to test four weeks before the championship trials.

The NCAA previously required transgender women to undergo testosterone suppression treatment for a year before competing on a women’s team.

Penn Athletics said it will work with the NCAA regarding Thomas’ participation in the 2022 Swimming and Diving Championship in March.

Yet, from the association representing college swimming and diving coaches to former Olympic swimmers to parents of collegiate swimmers, the NCAA’s new policy has been criticized as insufficient and lacking in clarity.

CNN has sought comment from the NCAA regarding the criticism.

“They do this in the middle of the season and clearly they haven’t thought it through,” said Joanna Harper, a transgender runner who studies transgender sports performance at England’s Loughborough University.

Harper, a medical physicist who published the first study of testosterone suppression and estrogen treatment on the performance of transgender athletes, added: “I don’t think this policy, for example, will affect Lia Thomas at all, and people are going to be unhappy because she’s fine.”

Thomas, 22, has not publicly commented on the new policy. She told the SwimSwam podcast last month that “continuing to swim after transitioning has been an incredibly rewarding experience.” She said she hoped to “continue doing the sport I love as an authentic me.”

Policy consistent with that of the Olympic Committees

The NCAA voted this week in favor of a “sport-by-sport approach to transgender participation”, according to it, in agreement with the United States and International Olympic Committees.

Transgender participation for each sport will be determined by the policy of the national sport governing body. In the absence of a national governing body, the policy of a sport’s international federation would apply. And if there is no international federation policy, “previously established IOC policy criteria would be followed,” according to a statement from the association.

“We are steadfast in our support of transgender student-athletes and in promoting equity in college sports,” said John DeGioia, chairman of the NCAA board of directors and president of Georgetown.

“It is important that NCAA member schools, conferences and varsity athletes compete in an inclusive, fair, safe and respectful environment and can move forward with a clear understanding of the new policy.”

About 80% of U.S. Olympians are current or former college athletes, according to NCAA President Mark Emmert.

The IOC announced a new framework on transgender athletes in November, saying no athlete should be excluded from competition on the assumption of an advantage because of their gender. The change placed the onus on individual sports federations to determine whether an athlete was at a disproportionate advantage.

Previous IOC policy allowed transgender athletes to compete provided their testosterone levels were below a certain limit for at least 12 months prior to competition.

Thomas addressed the IOC framework in his interview with Swimswam: “I think the guidelines they have established are very good. They do a very good job of promoting inclusivity while maintaining the integrity of the competition.”

Penn Athletics says it supports Thomas

At the University of Pennsylvania, parents of other swimmers questioned the fairness of allowing Thomas to run on the women’s team.

The mother of a swimmer at Penn said her concern was about fairness and the 1972 Title IX provision prohibiting sex discrimination in schools receiving federal funding which, in her words, “allowed women to shine in athletics”.

Title IX is credited with an explosion of women in collegiate athletics and schools pouring money into women’s sports.

“Girls who dedicate their lives to swimming, they start very early,” said the mother, who asked not to be identified for fear of reprisals against her daughter. “They never miss practice. They get up at 5 a.m. from the age of 12. They don’t take vacations.”

This mother and another parent worry that Thomas’ success will come at the expense of their own daughters’ chances to travel and compete due to roster limitations.

“My daughter, for example, all through high school she trained over 20 hours a week,” said the other parent, a father who asked to remain anonymous.

“Her only day off was Sunday. Besides maintaining the kind of academics required to get accepted into a school like the University of Pennsylvania. She worked four years in high school for that. Not to mention all the years before high school, the school that led to this, and then being told that you and your teammates are going to lose seats to a transgender woman.

In a statement, Penn Athletics said it supports Thomas and “we will work with the NCAA regarding his participation as part of the newly adopted standards for the 2022 NCAA Swimming and Diving Championship.”

Former Olympic swimmer Nancy Hogshead-Makar, who runs a nonprofit that provides legal defense for women in sport, said she was fine with the new policy because it would force transgender swimmers like Thomas to report their testosterone levels four weeks before the championship selections.

But she called the new policy unfair because of what she perceives to be Thomas’ biological advantage.

“Politics is a direct response to pressure”

The College Swimming & Diving Coaches Association, in a statement this week, supported Thomas’ right to compete and condemned the “hate” directed at her. But the association also said the new NCAA policy is “not a solution” and a “missed opportunity to lead” a “thorough, thoughtful, and scientific discussion about the balance between inclusion and equity.”

USA Swimming, the national governing body for the sport in the United States, expressed support for “inclusivity” and “competitive fairness”. In the statement, the organization pledged “to learn and educate us about the proper balance in this space.”

Chris Mosier, a transgender athlete and advocate, via Twitter said the NCAA had “fabricated a ridiculously complex policy that will prove impossible for them to follow.”

“Clearly this policy is a direct response to the pressure surrounding a current athlete competing in the NCAA,” Mosier said in a joint statement with Athlete Ally, a group that supports LGBTQ athletes.

“I’m disappointed that after years of discussion and calls for more research, a new policy could be quickly developed under pressure from people who don’t want to see a great transgender athlete succeed.”

The controversy surrounding Thomas comes at a time when a number of state legislatures have banned transgender girls and women in public high schools and colleges from competing on women’s and women’s sports teams.

Controversy ‘extremely exaggerated’, says researcher

Harper, who is transgender, estimated that about 50 of the approximately 200,000 athletes competing in women’s sports at the college level in the United States are transgender.

In 2015, Harper published the first study on how hormone therapy affects transgender athletes. He found that transgender distance runners had no inherent advantage as women. The study involved a small sample of runners, she said, adding that the muscle mass of transgender sprinters could benefit them in shorter races.

Eric Vilain, a geneticist specializing in gender-based biology at George Washington University, called Harper’s study “groundbreaking” in a 2018 article in Sciene – a peer-reviewed journal published by the Association. America for the Advancement of Science.

Still, there’s a heated debate in the scientific community about whether androgen hormones like testosterone are useful markers of athletic advantage, experts say.

Harper said controversy over Thomas’ record-breaking season stems from his dominance in the sport.

“I think a lot of the heat around Lia Thomas is just overblown,” Harper said.

“Trans women are not transitioning into sports. We are transitioning to be more like other women. And so as part of this therapy to be happier, healthier…trans women will go into this therapy and have consistent testosterone levels because it’s for their health, not because it has anything to do with sports.”

The-CNN-Wire

™ & © 2022 Cable News Network, Inc., a WarnerMedia company. All rights reserved.

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Simonek, one of the first six wrestlers to qualify for national championships, succeeds https://divegearjp.com/simonek-one-of-the-first-six-wrestlers-to-qualify-for-national-championships-succeeds/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 02:14:08 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/simonek-one-of-the-first-six-wrestlers-to-qualify-for-national-championships-succeeds/ SAN LUIS OBISPO, Calif. — Harold (Hal) Simonek, one of six wrestlers who was Cal Poly’s first NCAA Division I qualifier in 1958 and who coached multiple sports and served as athletic director over the course of 40-year career at Cerritos College, died Jan. 2, 2022, less than a month after his 90th birthday. Simonek, […]]]>
SAN LUIS OBISPO, Calif. — Harold (Hal) Simonek, one of six wrestlers who was Cal Poly’s first NCAA Division I qualifier in 1958 and who coached multiple sports and served as athletic director over the course of 40-year career at Cerritos College, died Jan. 2, 2022, less than a month after his 90th birthday.

Simonek, who was a three-time CIF Southern Section champion in wrestling and also won a CIF Southern Section individual title in swimming and diving at Inglewood High School, began his college career at Cal Poly in the early 1950s and, after a season with the Mustangs, drafted into the United States Navy, where he competed on the San Diego Naval Wrestling Team.

After his military service, Simonek enrolled at El Camino College, where he won 90% of his games and served as team captain. After earning his Associate of Arts degree, he returned to Cal Poly, won a conference title in 1958, and led the Mustangs to a Pacific Coast Intercollegiate Tag Team Championship.

Simonek majored in physical education at Cal Poly and, for a semester, was roommates with NFL Hall of Fame football coach John Madden, who died in late December at age 85. While on the wrestling team, Simonek took third place in the IBO, first place at the Far Western Championships, and first at the California Regional Olympic Trials.

He joined five other Cal Poly wrestlers – Tom Hall, Jerry Canfield, Fred Ford, Delmec Scales and Pat Lovell – to become the first to qualify for the 1958 NCAA National Championships, where he went 1-2. Lovell qualified for the 1964 Olympics in Tokyo.

Simonek earned a bachelor’s and master’s degree from Cal Poly in 1960.

Simonek’s first job after graduation was a three-year stint at Hawthorne High School, where he led the wrestling team to a Bay League title. During her 40 years (1963-2003) at Cerritos College, Simonek served as the school’s wrestling coach, instructor, athletic director, dean of athletics, women’s cross country coach, women’s water polo coach, and coach. female swimmer.

With the Falcons, Simonek coached the 1971 team to a state title and produced 19 individual state champions and 55 All-Americans.

“Hal was one of the best wrestling coaches I ever coached,” said John Woods, himself a Cal Poly graduate who placed second at the 1969 NCAA Division I Nationals. , was a two-time NCAA Division II All-American, placing first. in 1967, and coach at Palomar College.

“He had a weird way of developing student-athletes,” Woods added. “They would struggle to place in early tournaments and finish the season as an All-American. It was his passion for the sport and genuine concern for his athletes that made the difference. I learned a lot of Hall.”

Simonek celebrated his 90th birthday on December 11 with family, friends and former wrestlers.

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By day – Notes on nature: the crested merganser makes the shaggy coat spectacular https://divegearjp.com/by-day-notes-on-nature-the-crested-merganser-makes-the-shaggy-coat-spectacular/ Wed, 19 Jan 2022 14:01:22 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/by-day-notes-on-nature-the-crested-merganser-makes-the-shaggy-coat-spectacular/ Meet the crested merganser, a strikingly beautiful diving duck with a “shaggy” crested head that regularly visits our Connecticut shores in late fall and winter. “It is, like all species of its tribe, a most expert diver,” John James Audubon wrote of the crested merganser in 1833, adding, “and after being shot with a flintlock […]]]>

Meet the crested merganser, a strikingly beautiful diving duck with a “shaggy” crested head that regularly visits our Connecticut shores in late fall and winter.

“It is, like all species of its tribe, a most expert diver,” John James Audubon wrote of the crested merganser in 1833, adding, “and after being shot with a flintlock gun (it) s usually escapes by disappearing before the shot reaches where it was.

The “tribe” Audubon refers to are the mergansers, a family of diving ducks that have serrated, spike-like beaks that act like teeth, helping them grasp their prey: small, slippery fish. They include the common merganser, the hooded merganser and the crested merganser. All three visit Connecticut.

Interesting facts :

• Mergansers are one of the fastest flying ducks, recording up to 81 miles per hour. To catch the air, however, these elegant ducks need a head start. Their legs are positioned close to their rear, making it difficult to walk on land, but they are an asset when diving, according to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology website, allaboutbirds.org.

• The same website notes that red mergansers should eat 15-20 small fish per day. This means that these active birds need to dive underwater 250-300 times a day or feed for 4-5 hours to meet their daily energy needs.

What’s also fun with these birds is that you don’t need a powerful spotting scope to observe them. Mergansers hunt their prey in shallow water, close to shore, so you can often observe them up close without additional equipment.

In fact, off the tip of the borough of Stonington, where the water is clean and clear, I have often observed red mergansers, submerged, using their legs to propel themselves and squeeze through the water until at the waist for a minute or more. They are very agile under water.

Red mergansers are also very attractive.

Male Red-breasted Mergansers, for example, sport a dark green head, with a shaggy crested hairdo, red beak and eyes, a nice white collar around their necks, and an attractive rust-colored chest.

Female Red-breasted Mergansers sport more muted colors, but they still have that fun, shaggy hairstyle.

There’s a good reason why female birds don’t wear showy colors. When they’re sitting on a nest, incubating eggs, the last thing they want to do is stand out from predators. Instead, they want to become almost invisible and blend into the environment with very bland colors.

Enjoy bird watching!

Corrections and additions: In a recent column on praying mantises, I did not mention that there are two non-native praying mantises that surpass our native Carolina mantis (Stagmomantis carolina) for food sources, and their egg sacs must not be ordered through supply houses. These are the Chinese mantis (Tenodera sinensis) and the European mantis (Mantis religiosa).

Bill Hobbs lives in Stonington and is an avid bird watcher. He can be reached for comments at whobbs246@gmail.com.

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THS diving program to tackle the state in February | local sports https://divegearjp.com/ths-diving-program-to-tackle-the-state-in-february-local-sports/ Mon, 17 Jan 2022 20:58:00 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/ths-diving-program-to-tackle-the-state-in-february-local-sports/ THOMASVILLE – A pair of divers from Thomasville High are hoping to win individual state championships when they compete in the Georgia High School Association state meet on Thursday, Feb. 3. Juniors AC Taylor and Jake Pinney will face the rest of the state when they meet, hosted at Georgia Tech. Thomasville High coach Kenly […]]]>

THOMASVILLE – A pair of divers from Thomasville High are hoping to win individual state championships when they compete in the Georgia High School Association state meet on Thursday, Feb. 3.

Juniors AC Taylor and Jake Pinney will face the rest of the state when they meet, hosted at Georgia Tech.

Thomasville High coach Kenly Milam discussed the opportunity his two divers have and the potential to increase the sport’s popularity in South Georgia.

“It’s truly an honor to have this opportunity to watch them dive and learn more about diving. It’s not a popular sport here. A lot of people don’t,” said Milam, whose two divers both train at Moss Farms Diving in Moultrie. “Moss Farms is pretty elite. Last year I had four divers to visit and one of them is now diving at UGA (University of Georgia). Two of them have gone to other colleges One of them is AC Taylor who is still diving.

Former Thomasville swimmer Nolan Lewis, who now competes in UGA, won the Georgia 1-3A state championship in 1-meter diving last year.

Taylor and Pinney hope to continue Thomasville’s success in diving as they will also compete in the 1 meter diving competition.

The pair will be scored by a panel of five judges. They will run six dives at the state meet. The lowest and highest scores for each dive will be dropped, leaving three scores for each dive. All scores will be counted and multiplied by the degree of difficulty of the dive which will give the participants their total. The six totals will be added together for a final score.

Thomasville will have one last meeting before the state. He will travel to Westminster in Atlanta on Friday.

Milam also uses her coaching platform to educate others about the sport, especially the fourth graders she teaches at Scott Elementary.

“I tell them what it is because they don’t really know. I didn’t know it until I was thrown into it. I also take the opportunity to teach it to my children,” Milam said.

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Megan Maholic played a major role in Villa Maria’s success at the North East swimming and diving competition https://divegearjp.com/megan-maholic-played-a-major-role-in-villa-marias-success-at-the-north-east-swimming-and-diving-competition/ Sun, 16 Jan 2022 03:46:08 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/megan-maholic-played-a-major-role-in-villa-marias-success-at-the-north-east-swimming-and-diving-competition/ NORTHEAST – Megan Maholic knew the two people whose pool records she broke at Saturday’s North East Girls Swimming and Diving Invitational. One was Marie Georger, the former Mercyhurst Prep PIAA gold medalist who also did rounds for the University of Michigan. She also competed in the 2012 United States Olympic Swimming Trials. Maholic, who […]]]>

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South Jersey Times Swim Diary: Clearview Sherrill, Rosenberger Dive Well https://divegearjp.com/south-jersey-times-swim-diary-clearview-sherrill-rosenberger-dive-well/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/south-jersey-times-swim-diary-clearview-sherrill-rosenberger-dive-well/ The tri-county conference wrapped up its fourth round of batch dive meetings Monday at the Gloucester County Institute of Technology pool in Deptford Township. Peyton Sherrill of the Clearview High women’s swim team continues to post strong numbers. In Monday’s diving batch competition, the runner-up had the best score of 225.8, a season-high total. His […]]]>

The tri-county conference wrapped up its fourth round of batch dive meetings Monday at the Gloucester County Institute of Technology pool in Deptford Township.

Peyton Sherrill of the Clearview High women’s swim team continues to post strong numbers. In Monday’s diving batch competition, the runner-up had the best score of 225.8, a season-high total.

His best score in his first season was 203.85. She has eclipsed that in all four meetings this season. It threatens the program record of 235.9 in 1998.

“She’s an incredibly talented diver,” said head coach Skyler Lindsey. “She entered freshman last year and I was blown away by what she was able to do. She is a very, very good child. She comes to train prepared every day, reading to learn. She is one of those children who, when she comes out of the water, her facial expression shows everything.

“A lot of kids are looking at you.“ Coach, what did I do wrong? ”I can ask,“ Peyton, how was that dive? What did you think? ‘ And she’ll go all the way, and she’ll let me know. She really knows what I would say to her. I think she’s going to break the program record. She’s a really dedicated girl. She’s a very hard worker. tough and a very good child.

On the boys’ side, Jake Rosenberger of Clearview was the top male diver on Monday with a score of 201.3. The first-year season’s best score was 218.4, which was recorded in the batch meet on December 6. Clearview’s boys’ record is 226.25 from 2019.

“I’ve known Jake since he was probably 8 years old,” Lindsey said. “I coached him in a summer league. The good thing about Jake is that he’s very versatile. He’s a diver and a swimmer, and he’s good at both. It’s not very often that you’ll see a swimmer and diver as good as Jake. He is fearless. He has a lot of potential. He’s a really fun diver to watch and to work with. I can’t wait to see what he does over the next four years.

Clearview head diving coach Skyler Lindsey, left, was pleased with sophomore diver Peyton Sherrill’s progress. (Photo courtesy of Coach Skyler Lindsey)

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Lindsey said one of her proudest moments this season was her decision to let Olivia Kristel join the Gloucester Tech squad. The junior reached out to Lindsey, who coaches divers Clearview, Kingsway and Gloucester Tech, two weeks into the preseason as testing continued to ask if it was too late to join the sport.

Lindsey’s initial response was yes since Kristel missed orientation etc. However, Lindsey changed her mind.

Lindsey said, “I said, ‘Alright, why don’t you go out? I’ll give you a day or two and see what you have. It was one of the best decisions I have made. She got out, and she just rocked him on the plank. She was absolutely gorgeous. She is constantly smiling, which I like. She’s doing great. I’m really glad I let her out.

Kristel got a record score of 164.5 on Monday. The Cheetahs’ daughter record is 187.80 for 2014.

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When the South Jersey Interscholastic Swimming Association decided not to hold their invite this season due to COVID-19 concerns, they also canceled the remaining diving season. It was a stab at the divers in the area as there are not a lot of diving competitions and diving is not part of the swimming competition. In addition, the canceled competition left one less opportunity to qualify for the NJSIAA Championships.

However, coaches in the region have obtained approval from the SJISA to host a smaller competition of 11 dives where the scores will be used to allow divers to qualify for the state competition which is scheduled for 1st and 2nd. March. The meet will be held on January 19 at Gloucester Tech, the same day that the SJISA 11-Dive Championships would have taken place.

Divers will also have the Gloucester County Championships (January 28) and the Tri-County Conference Showcase (February 2) on the competition schedule.

“After last year where they had about four practices and like two meetings, I think they were just happy to be on the board and compete,” said Lindsey. “The really good divers, who were going to do really well and qualify for the States, were really disappointed when I told them (about the cancellation of the SJISA competition).

“When I saw their faces when I told them that, I mean their whole demeanor changed. You could tell they were really upset. Seeing the looks on their faces, I was like, ‘I gotta find a way around this. I have to find a way for these kids to have a chance to get to America. It was then that I contacted the SJISA.

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Jamaican Olympic Association Equipment Grant Program Bearing Sweet Fruit https://divegearjp.com/jamaican-olympic-association-equipment-grant-program-bearing-sweet-fruit/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 20:41:56 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/jamaican-olympic-association-equipment-grant-program-bearing-sweet-fruit/ For the past seven years, Yona Knight-Wisdom has been the sole face of Jamaican diving, representing the country at the 2014 Commonwealth Games, the Pan American Games, and the 2016 and 2020 Olympics. That could be about to change as another talented young diver has emerged eager to represent the land of wood and water. […]]]>

For the past seven years, Yona Knight-Wisdom has been the sole face of Jamaican diving, representing the country at the 2014 Commonwealth Games, the Pan American Games, and the 2016 and 2020 Olympics.

That could be about to change as another talented young diver has emerged eager to represent the land of wood and water.

Those who watched might have had their first glimpse of Yohan Eskrick-Parkinson’s synchronized diving with Knight-Wisdom at the Scottish National and Open Diving Championships December 2-5 at the Royal Commonwealth Pool in Edinburgh.

The newly formed pair finished second in the 3m synchro with a decent score of 375.60 and already the senior partner has started to have a positive influence on the newcomer.

“Diving with Yona has been an unprecedented learning experience,” Yohan told Sportsmax. TV.

“Yona’s experience in diving is immense, and exposure to the lifestyle and training of an Olympic athlete has allowed me to learn what it takes to perform at such a high level. Yona is an exemplary mentor and leader.

Yohan was born in Calgary, Canada in 2000 to Canadian Melissa Escrick and Jamaican Desmond Parkinson and started diving when he was just eight years old.

Growing up in Calgary, he attended National Sport School (NSS) high school while practicing diving. Deciding he wanted to explore NCAA-level diving possibilities, Yohan was accepted to Northwestern University where he is in his fourth year of studying neuroscience with the intention of attending medical school.

A diving for Northwestern, Yohan was a two-time finalist (1m, 3m) at the 2020 Big 10 Conference Championships. He was also a finalist in the 1m springboard at the Conference Championships in March.

It was in high school that Yona first caught Yohan’s attention and he has followed his career ever since.

“Several coaches had urged me to explore the possibility of diving for Jamaica and I started doing it during my sophomore year of college,” he said. “Yona really paved the way for me and inspired me to dive for Jamaica.”

In early 2019, he decided to contact Knight-Wisdom to find out how he started diving for Jamaica and they developed a relationship.

“He reached out to me on Instagram just sending me a few videos of him diving,” Knight-Wisdom explained.

“We talked a bit without making plans, then after Tokyo was out of the way I decided to see if we could shake things up.”

Which they did at the Scottish Championships earlier this month after training together for about a week.

“The synchronized training with Yona was a success. Of course, it can be difficult to really know how well we would sync just by watching each other dive, so traveling to Scotland to train together was an important step in the process of seeing if syncing might be a possibility, ”he said. Yohan said.

“Luckily the sync went well from the start and we only had to make a few minor adjustments to get a rudimentary sync. This is a small but very important step towards the internationalization of our sync team. I believe we have a lot of potential to move forward.

Already a Jamaican citizen, Yohan is awaiting his Jamaican passport with the intention of representing Jamaica at future events in the years to come from 2022.

“As diving is still a new sport for Jamaica, my goal is to compete and see how far I can go both individually and in sync. It is an incredible opportunity to be among the first divers to represent Jamaica in diving. I hope my performance will inspire more Jamaicans to dive in the future, ”he said.

In the meantime, Yohan is focusing on the next phase of his studies, already recognizing the significant challenge of studying medicine while training and competing as a diver. Nonetheless, he hopes to overcome the challenges with the hopes of representing his father’s country of birth at the highest level.

“Currently, I am at a stage of both academic and athletic transition where I am finishing my studies in the spring and planning to move on to graduate studies. I applied to several medical schools and am also applying for several masters as a back-up plan in case I have to take a few years off before applying to medical school again, ”he explained.

“Although diving in medical school is a big challenge due to the intensity of the studies, I will continue to train throughout the summer and see what opportunities arise to continue my pursuit of the sport.

“I will first take the necessary steps to participate in some international events in 2022 and assess whether the Olympics are a possibility. The opportunity to try to qualify for the Olympics for the Jamaican team is very exciting for me, and I will continue to work hard next year and see how I stack up internationally.

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Penn’s Lia Thomas wins two races at tri-meet, loses 100 freestyle yards to transgender swimmer from Yale https://divegearjp.com/penns-lia-thomas-wins-two-races-at-tri-meet-loses-100-freestyle-yards-to-transgender-swimmer-from-yale/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 21:54:41 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/penns-lia-thomas-wins-two-races-at-tri-meet-loses-100-freestyle-yards-to-transgender-swimmer-from-yale/ University of Pennsylvania transgender swimmer Lia Thomas won the 200 and 500-meter freestyle and finished fifth in the 100-meter freestyle in the school’s tri-meet with Yale and Dartmouth. Thomas finished about two seconds ahead of his opponents with a time of 1: 48.73 in the 200 freestyle. She missed out on setting an NCAA record […]]]>

University of Pennsylvania transgender swimmer Lia Thomas won the 200 and 500-meter freestyle and finished fifth in the 100-meter freestyle in the school’s tri-meet with Yale and Dartmouth.

Thomas finished about two seconds ahead of his opponents with a time of 1: 48.73 in the 200 freestyle. She missed out on setting an NCAA record held by Olympian Missy Franklin, who finished the event in 1: 39.10 in 2015. Thomas was not as dominant as she was in the Zippy Invitational in Akron last month.

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Thomas narrowly won the 500 freestyle, according to the Daily Mail.

She faced a real challenge in the 100m freestyle of Yale’s Iszac Henig, who is transitioning from female to male status. Henig clocked 49.57 seconds with Thomas finishing behind him with a time of 52.84 seconds.

Henig, a California native who has competed for Yale since 2018, stunned limited spectators at the race.

Lia Thomas’ domination in the pool has sparked outrage from some.
(Penn Athletics)

“I wasn’t prepared for this. It’s all messed up. I can’t figure this out. The NCAA needs to do something about it. They need to bring science into the decision and the discussion,” said a parent at Penn. at The Daily Mail.

Henig had his breasts removed, but wrote in a New York Times column in June that he wasn’t taking hormones yet because he wanted to compete in the pool.

“As a student-athlete, coming out as a trans type put me in a weird position. I could start using hormones to align myself more with myself, or wait, make a social transition and keep going. to compete in a women’s swim team. I chose the latter option, “Henig wrote.

“I appreciate my contributions to the team and I recognize that my childhood doesn’t depend on having more or less testosterone in my veins. At least that’s what I’ll try to remember when I will put on the women’s swimsuit for the competition and I remember one me that I no longer feel attached to. “

LIA THOMAS FINDS SUPPORT FROM PENN, IVY LEAGUE BEFORE WEEKEND MEETING

Henig’s specialty in the pool is freestyle and butterfly.

Thomas’ frenetic pace in the pool caught the attention of those wondering if transgender women should compete with biological men. Thomas received support from the Ivy League and Penn earlier in the week.

“For the past several years, Lia and the University of Pennsylvania have worked with the NCAA to follow all appropriate protocols in order to comply with the NCAA policy on the participation of transgender athletes and participating in the Women’s Team. Penn’s swimming and diving. The Ivy League has adopted and enforces the same NCAA policy, “the conference said in a statement Thursday.

“The Ivy League reaffirms its unwavering commitment to providing an inclusive environment for all student-athletes while condemning transphobia and discrimination in all its forms.

“The league is thrilled with its participation in the sport of women’s swimming and diving and looks forward to celebrating the success of all of our student-athletes throughout the season.

Penn Athletics also released a statement.

The NCAA has policies governing transgender competitors.

The NCAA has policies governing transgender competitors.
(AP Photo / Michael Conroy, file)

“Penn Athletics is committed to being a welcoming and inclusive environment for all of our student-athletes, coaches and staff, and we stand by that commitment today and into the future,” the school said.

“As a member of the NCAA, Penn is governed by the policies of the National Governing Body. Lia Thomas has met or exceeded all NCAA protocols in the past two years for a transgender student-athlete to compete for a women’s team and will continue to represent the Penn Women’s Swim Team in competition this season.

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“We fully support all of the student-athletes and coaches in our swim and diving program and look forward to the continued success of the team this season. “


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