Diving Team – Dive Gear JP http://divegearjp.com/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 08:42:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://divegearjp.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon.png Diving Team – Dive Gear JP http://divegearjp.com/ 32 32 Eden Cheng seeks to ‘seize the moment’ at World Diving Championships https://divegearjp.com/eden-cheng-seeks-to-seize-the-moment-at-world-diving-championships/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 08:42:30 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/eden-cheng-seeks-to-seize-the-moment-at-world-diving-championships/ June 24, 2022 Eden Cheng wants to ‘enjoy the moment’ as she makes Britain’s diving team for the FINA World Aquatics Championships. The eight-day diving competition takes place indoors at Duna Arena in Hungary and is the first time the event has been held since 2019. The 2022 World Championships are the benchmark diving competition […]]]>

Eden Cheng wants to ‘enjoy the moment’ as she makes Britain’s diving team for the FINA World Aquatics Championships.

The eight-day diving competition takes place indoors at Duna Arena in Hungary and is the first time the event has been held since 2019.

The 2022 World Championships are the benchmark diving competition in a busy year, less than 12 months after a record medal haul for British divers at the Olympics.

Britain won three medals at the 2020 Olympics, the same number they won at the last World Championships in Gwanju where they won a silver and two bronze.

The 14-person British team has a good mix of youth and experience with seven divers making their World Championship debut alongside those with both Olympic and world experience.

Teenager and Tokyo 2020 Olympian Cheng is competing at her second world championships after being part of the British synchro teams in 2019.

This year she has the opportunity to compete as an individual and she is looking forward to showing her talent on the world stage.

She said: “It’s my first world championships as an individual diver and I think it’s also my first big competition as an individual because for a few years I’ve been part of the synchronized team.

“So for me, it’s about gaining experience on such a big stage and not having expectations that are too high for me because it’s my first time.

“I just want to enjoy the moment and whatever happens, happens.”

The crowd gives me “a little more adrenaline”

Cheng, the European gold medalist, is thrilled to be part of the team and to be back in international competition.

She said: “It’s really exciting to be part of such an amazing team with a lot of rookies and experienced veterans on the team.

“It’s a great team to be a part of and we’re really excited to be back in international competition with a big crowd as well.

“Just being back on the World Tour and seeing all the strong performances from everyone around the world is really exciting and it’s amazing to be part of such an amazing team.”

After a tough few years, Cheng believes the return of a great crowd will make a huge difference and believes it will give him an extra edge in the competition.

She added: “It’s going to be strange at first but there were a few spectators at a few national events which was a good step before the bigger competitions.

“Just getting that atmosphere back and having fans in the stands lets us know that people are enjoying the sport.

“It’s been quite difficult recently because there haven’t been any physical people and for an athlete it’s quite daunting not knowing how many people are watching.

“I think having people there gives you a bit more adrenaline and it makes the competition a lot more enjoyable in general.”

The team is “like my second family”

At 19, Cheng is still in the early stages of her career and is grateful for the family feeling within the team, allowing her to benefit from the experience of those around her.

“It’s a great feeling around the team,” she said. “I’ve been traveling with this team for a while and it’s like my second family.

“I also think these top world medalists, Olympic champions, Olympic medalists, just to have their stories and their advice is just amazing.

“I can train alongside them. Just learning little tips from them is exhilarating and exciting to be a part of.

Coming into his second world championships, Cheng shared his advice with the team members who are set to make their debuts in Budapest.

“I think my advice would be to have fun,” she said. “Soak in and don’t be afraid because you’ve earned your place on this team and you’re meant to be here.

“I think when I made my debut, the pressure I was putting on myself made me think ‘am I really supposed to be here?’

“But for those who are here for the first time, just know that you came here of your own free will, so get out there and enjoy.

“You dive alongside your diving heroes, your role models, so have fun and relax would be my message to them.”

The diving events close the FINA World Aquatic Championships and take place from Sunday June 26 to Sunday July 3.

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Who is the best sub? Inside the Army Combat Diver Competition https://divegearjp.com/who-is-the-best-sub-inside-the-army-combat-diver-competition/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 21:06:10 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/who-is-the-best-sub-inside-the-army-combat-diver-competition/ A line of orange buoys snaked through the black waters of McKellars Pond in Fort Bragg. On the banks, spectators stood quietly as the markers advanced, one by one, between a series of floating checkpoints, each about 100 yards apart. Although those on land could only see the slow movement of the orange buoys, each […]]]>

A line of orange buoys snaked through the black waters of McKellars Pond in Fort Bragg. On the banks, spectators stood quietly as the markers advanced, one by one, between a series of floating checkpoints, each about 100 yards apart. Although those on land could only see the slow movement of the orange buoys, each marked the progress of a team of two special forces combat divers just below the surface, sailing as a team. Even the bubbles did not betray them.

Using only an underwater compass, the dive teams zigzagged between targets – one, two, three, four. The black water conditions meant divers might not be able to see their own hands, let alone a checkpoint a few feet away. As the event progressed, one team’s buoy drifted off target, toward shore.

“They’re going far,” said a timekeeper, just as the team collided with the shore on the other side of the pond.

A team of special forces combat divers complete the navigation dive at the 2022 Best Combat Diver competition at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Both are fitted with rebreather systems, which “purify” the diver’s air supply of carbon dioxide, allowing him to dive without emitting telltale bubbles. U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Dominique Cox.

A total of nine teams took turns navigating the star-shaped course, the first element of the final challenge of the 2022 Best Combat Diver Competition.

As the divers headed for the finish line, marked by a red and white dive flag, one team veered almost 40 meters off course. “I’ll get them,” said a timekeeper, before chasing after the strays. The following team missed by 10 yards, but the one following them lined up for the flag. The orange buoy steadily approached the shore until dark shapes were visible just below the surface. Their heads broke in the water, then their glasses.

The duo smiled and stood up. Hit. They waded the last few yards to the dive flag, dragging grass, branches and soaked cammies ashore. “I feel like I’m in a ghillie suit,” said one diver. They fell to the ground and unraveled.

“All good?” asked a dive master.

“All is well,” the divers replied, disposing of their rigs, specially designed rebreather systems which, unlike traditional scuba gear used by most civilians, recycle and cleanse fumes of a diver, releasing no bubbles that would leave a telltale trace on the surface above.

underwater navigation
An Army combat diver navigates underwater using a compass in 2014. U.S. Army photo.

Once the dive master made sure the pair had no adverse medical effects from the dive, the team raced down a ravine in a waist-deep mud culvert for the final piece of the challenge: a shooting event at a booth across the street.

After all, a diving operation is just a way for special operators to get to work.

Dive, run and shoot

sergeant. 1st Class Rob and Master Sgt. Joe – who asked to be identified only by his first names – hosted the contest at Fort Bragg.

“Over the past 20 years, I think [dive] went by the wayside with the desert wars, and as a result, we’re sort of the redhead son-in-law of the bunch. said Rob. “Our goal with [the Best Combat Diver Competition] is to increase awareness in the maritime community and the diving community.

Organized by the 3rd Special Forces Group from Fort Bragg and presented by the Combat Divers Foundationa non-profit organization, the second annual contest ended on Thursday, June 16. Nine teams competed over two days, including elite divers from the Army’s 1st, 3rd, 5th, and 7th Special Forces Groups as well as a competitor from the Air Force’s 14th. Air Support Operations Squadron.

Two Green Berets from the 7th Special Forces Group won the title. Events included pool events, a 5 mile run in near 90 degree heat, a written test, boat maneuvers and the final sailing dive and shot scramble. At the pool, competitors faced obstacle courses that included rescuing a 300-pound dummy and assembling a Glock 19 underwater while wearing dark goggles.

combat diver competition
The second day of the best diver competition included a surface swim, a wing slalom and a kayak race. U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Dominique Cox.

Combat diver is not a job in the military, but a qualification that many special operators earn by undergoing extensive training that is widely considered to be some of the most grueling in the military. Divers learn to conduct maritime missions and gain undetected access to shore targets. Combat divers learn the basics of small boat infiltration and underwater navigation, often swimming in the same gear a soldier would normally carry on their back.

The competition at Fort Bragg tested the whole diver, testing strength and speed as well as technical know-how. sergeant. 1st Class Mike, who came up with the idea for a Best Combat Diver competition for Army divers, was impressed with this year’s events. “Last year there were more endurance events. This year we took part in a lot more technical events, which is great,” he said.

Who is the best?

Soldiers and event organizers hope the competition will expand to include other military branches with combat diving missions. The The Marines and Air Force both conduct independent dive qualification courses similar to those of the Army, while Navy SEALs undergo combat dive training as part of their initial qualification. Military-scale sniper competitions are held regularly – including one at Fort Bragg for special operations teams – and other contests like Best Ranger regularly draw participants from units around the world. But combat diving, though practiced in most special operations teams across four branches of the military, has no such central event.

So which branch really has the best combat divers? It’s a question, organizers say, that can only be answered with strong participation from all branches of the military.

“Last year we had six teams: five teams from the 3rd group, one team from the 7th group,” said Mike. “This year we have nine teams.” Representation grew to include teams from four of the five active duty Special Forces groups and a specialist from the Air Force Tactical Air Control Group, or TACP, who partnered with a diver from the ‘army.

Combat diver competition
The organizers of the 2022 Best Combat Diver competition have ensured that competitors will also face plenty of challenges on land, such as the “shooting scramble”. U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Dominique Cox.

Rob said even more competitors were initially expected to compete this week. Seventeen teams, including pairs from Marine Forces Special Operations Command and Marine Corps Force Reconnaissance, signed up, but last-minute injuries, deployments and other hurdles interfered.

Mike thinks planning and moving the competition earlier would create more buzz. “We’re crossing our fingers that we can hold it somewhere in the South,” he said. Logistically, a competition on a beach makes sense – and it wouldn’t hurt spectator participation. The three diving schools are in Florida: the army school in Key West; the Marines and the Air Force at Panama City Beach. And the 7th Group is headquartered at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida.

Joe Phanton, a retired 3rd Group soldier who now advises the Combat Diver Foundation, praised his former colleagues for the competition’s growth. “It’s important to note that the 3rd group started this and developed it until it is today,” Phanton said.

Competitors in the 2022 Best Combat Diver competition swim in a pool event. U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Dominique Cox.

But he throws down the gauntlet. “What we would like to see is for it to become even bigger and more inclusive of the diving community from other branches, such as the Marines and Navy, Air Force, so that it really is a competition of best diver,” Phanton said. “I think it would be a really good friendly rivalry between the service branches.”

sergeant. 1st Class Tory A. and Captain Drew F. of the U.S. Army’s 7th Special Forces Group proved to be the best of the best, taking first place. Full names were not available due to all competitors serving in special operations on active duty. The full results of the Best Combat Diver competition were announced at an awards ceremony on Thursday:

Results by team, Competition for the best combat diver 2022:

  1. 7th group
  2. 3rd Group
  3. 7th group
  4. 3rd Group
  5. 3rd Group
  6. 7th group
  7. 5th Group
  8. 1st group
  9. 3rd Group/14th ASOS

Read more : Army Called Them Criminals – Now Soldiers Hope Congress Solves Recruitment Scandal Fallout

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Two police officers taken away in Nagaon; 1 body recovered https://divegearjp.com/two-police-officers-taken-away-in-nagaon-1-body-recovered/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 04:39:08 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/two-police-officers-taken-away-in-nagaon-1-body-recovered/ In a terrible event, two police officers were washed away by flood waters along the Kampur area of ​​Nagaon district on Sunday night. Authorities say two members of a team from Kampur Police Station, including the officer in charge, were swept away by floodwaters while investigating a case late on Sunday evening. Although the body […]]]>

In a terrible event, two police officers were washed away by flood waters along the Kampur area of ​​Nagaon district on Sunday night.

Authorities say two members of a team from Kampur Police Station, including the officer in charge, were swept away by floodwaters while investigating a case late on Sunday evening.

Although the body of a police officer has been found, the officer in charge of Kampur police station is still missing.

State Disaster Response Force (SDRF), fire and emergency services, police teams immediately rushed to the scene for search and rescue operations.

The deceased police officer has been identified as – Rajib Bordoloi; while the missing policeman has been identified as – Samujjal Kakati.

“It’s a horrible situation. My phone conversation with OC sir lasted until 10:30 p.m. on Sunday. The incident happened when they went to investigate a case. – informed the sub-inspector, Hem Chandra Mahanta.

However, an SDRF member – Hardeep Singh remarked, “We arrived at the scene around 1am, after getting information about the event. So far, we’ve only found one police officer’s body. A deep dive team has also reached the location and is carrying out a search and rescue operation.

The current wave of floods along the northeastern state of Assam, triggered by heavy and incessant rains, has displaced more than 70,000 citizens, leaving behind huge trails of devastation. A number of stretches, bridges, and irrigation canals were damaged throughout the state; submerging many hamlets.

On the other hand, massive landslides and floods have damaged railway, bridges and road connectivity throughout the region.

According ANI report, nearly 42.28 lakh from 33 districts – Bajali, Baksa, Barpeta, Biswanath, Bongaigaon, Cachar, Darrang, Dhemaji, Dhubri, Dibrugarh, Dima Hasao, Goalpara, Hojai, Kamrup, Kamrup (Metro), Karbi Anglong West, Karimganj, Kokrajhar, Lakhimpur, Majuli, Morigaon, Nagaon, Nalbari, Sivasagar, Sonitpur, Sivasagar, South Salmara, Tamulpur, Tinsukia, Udalguri, were badly affected by the second wave of the disaster.

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Underwater Undead: Zombie-themed scuba diving in Wainwright teaches skills https://divegearjp.com/underwater-undead-zombie-themed-scuba-diving-in-wainwright-teaches-skills/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/underwater-undead-zombie-themed-scuba-diving-in-wainwright-teaches-skills/ On Saturday, Clear Lake in Wainwright will be overrun by zombies. The lake, about 235 kilometers southeast of Edmonton, will be the site of a zombie-themed dive training day organized by Alberta Adventure Divers. The training is officially certified by the Professional Association of Diving Instructors – the largest scuba diving training system in the […]]]>

On Saturday, Clear Lake in Wainwright will be overrun by zombies.

The lake, about 235 kilometers southeast of Edmonton, will be the site of a zombie-themed dive training day organized by Alberta Adventure Divers.

The training is officially certified by the Professional Association of Diving Instructors – the largest scuba diving training system in the world. Those who successfully complete the course will receive a formal Zombie Apocalypse Diver qualification.

Alberta Adventure Divers began offering the course last year.

“Thanks to COVID, it was a way to keep our active divers diving,” said Connie Faas, dive leader and dive instructor since 2004.

The course is not only an opportunity to wear zombie costumes underwater. It also teaches important skills for divers.

The Zombie Apocalypse Diver course allows divers to sharpen their abilities, problem-solving skills useful both underwater and above, and refresh their knowledge of first aid.

Divers practice their search and recovery skills, as well as their buoyancy skills. In scuba diving, buoyancy is the diver’s ability to maintain and control their depth.

“They look really scary”

There are wandering “zombies” underwater, represented by Faas and his assistants, who wear zombie costumes over their dry suits.

“I have some that really fill the role,” Faas said.

“They have red and yellow contacts in their eyes. So they look really scary. They make the hair really scary underwater.”

Kevin Shortt is a qualified Zombie Apocalypse divemaster and diver who will help administer the course this year.

He said the class wasn’t just a practice scuba diver with zombie cosplay strewn across the top, but a great opportunity for a fun day out with the family.

“When I first heard of it, I didn’t think it was a real certified course. But it was [a] great opportunity, lots of family fun for surface support and divers,” he said.

It’s a great opportunity for divers to do something different from the usual institutionalized instruction in scuba diving, Shortt said.

It also gives people a chance to take a selfie with an underwater zombie and bring back fond memories, he said.

There’s plenty to see at the bottom of Clear Lake, Faas said, including a life-size underwater ceramic cow, a sea monster that divers affectionately call Ogopogo and a sunken plane.

The club is very active, despite its location far from major urban centers.

“People don’t really think of the Prairies when they think of scuba diving. But our club has been very active. It has hundreds of members,” said Roxanne Shortt, wife of Kevin Shortt and who provides a surface support for dives.

The Shortts are based in Lloydminster and the club has members from across Alberta and Saskatchewan.

Kevin Shortt decided to take up scuba diving after a fatal drowning in Lloydminster. He was one of the lifeguards and they had to wait hours for divers to arrive from out of town. After this incident he decided that Lloydminster needed a dive team, and to get one he had to learn to dive.

“So because of her commitment to life, people and emergency services, we started diving and from there it was a wonderful experience every time,” Roxanne Shortt said.

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The diving team is looking for the man from Albia who has been missing since 1984 https://divegearjp.com/the-diving-team-is-looking-for-the-man-from-albia-who-has-been-missing-since-1984/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 03:33:48 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/the-diving-team-is-looking-for-the-man-from-albia-who-has-been-missing-since-1984/ ALBIA, Iowa – Harry Milligan disappeared from Albia on July 1, 1984 at just 21 years old. Thirty-eight years later, people aren’t giving up trying to find answers about where he might have gone. “I probably drove all the gravel roads in Monroe County trying to find him,” Milligan’s brother Mark Milligan said. A private […]]]>

ALBIA, Iowa – Harry Milligan disappeared from Albia on July 1, 1984 at just 21 years old. Thirty-eight years later, people aren’t giving up trying to find answers about where he might have gone.

“I probably drove all the gravel roads in Monroe County trying to find him,” Milligan’s brother Mark Milligan said.

A private dive team, Chaos Divers, is the latest entity to handle the missing person case of Harry Milligan. The Illinois-based team has spent the past week looking for clues in and around Albia.

“It’s something good that we can do, we can get the sonar and try to help solve cold cases,” said Chaos Divers founder Jacob Grubbs.

The team specializes in finding vehicles underwater. Milligan’s car has also never been seen since her disappearance.

“In our work, we brought ten people home,” Grubbs said.

“We looked for places that I didn’t think were accessible this time around,” said Chaos Diving team member Lindsay Bussick. “We crossed thirteen ponds, three reservoirs, Lake Miami and Lake Rathbun.”

The dive team found no trace of Harry Milligan, but Mark said even finding no answers provided answers on its own.

“It helped ease my mind because I may not know where it is, but I know where it isn’t,” said Mark Milligan.

The Chaos Divers moved on to another mission in Missouri after Wednesday’s search. The team said they plan to return, and Mark Milligan will continue to search for Harry in the meantime.

“I told Mark I would do whatever it takes,” Grubbs said. “We did it, as a team.”

“I know I’ll find it one day,” said Mark Milligan. “Whether that’s when I meet my maker or not, I know I’m not going to give up.”

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Australia QUALIFIES for the World Cup after beating Peru on penalties after a 0-0 draw https://divegearjp.com/australia-qualifies-for-the-world-cup-after-beating-peru-on-penalties-after-a-0-0-draw/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 22:09:33 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/australia-qualifies-for-the-world-cup-after-beating-peru-on-penalties-after-a-0-0-draw/ Australia’s dancing substitute goalkeeper Andrew Redmayne saved the final penalty to earn a place at this year’s World Cup in Qatar as they beat Peru 5-4 in a shootout after a 0-0 draw after extra time in an intercontinental play-off on Monday. . Redmayne danced across the goal line before diving to the right to […]]]>

Australia’s dancing substitute goalkeeper Andrew Redmayne saved the final penalty to earn a place at this year’s World Cup in Qatar as they beat Peru 5-4 in a shootout after a 0-0 draw after extra time in an intercontinental play-off on Monday. .

Redmayne danced across the goal line before diving to the right to save an Alex Valera penalty and hand Australia a deserved victory at the Ahmad bin Ali Stadium.

Redmayne had been brought in with three minutes remaining for the shootout and became an instant hero with his antics on the line as he sought to distract rival kickers.

Australia booked their World Cup spot after beating Peru on penalties

Australian reserve goalkeeper Andrew Redmayne (left) was the hero of the shootout

Australian reserve goalkeeper Andrew Redmayne (left) was the hero of the shootout

Australia's heroes celebrate their dramatic penalty shoot-out win over Peru in the dressing room

Australia’s heroes celebrate their dramatic penalty shoot-out win over Peru in the dressing room

Redmayne saved Alex Valera's kick in sudden death to take Australia to the World Cup

Redmayne saved Alex Valera’s kick in sudden death to take Australia to the World Cup

Socceroos boss Graham Arnold reacts to qualifying for a fifth consecutive World Cup

Socceroos boss Graham Arnold reacts to qualifying for a fifth consecutive World Cup

He danced up and down, flailing his hips and throwing his arms in a throwback to the clownish antics of Liverpool’s Bruce Grobbelaar when they won the European Cup in 1984.

It was enough for Luis Advincula to launch his effort against the post and then for Valera to have his effort saved as Australia qualified for a fifth consecutive World Cup and sixth overall.

They will play in Group D of the World Cup with defending champions France, Denmark and Tunisia. The finals take place from November 21 to December 18.

Socceroos players celebrate wildly after beating Peru in the World Cup play-offs on Monday

Socceroos players celebrate wildly after beating Peru in the World Cup play-offs on Monday

Milos Degenek sprays water as Socceroos stars celebrate World Cup appearance in Qatar

Milos Degenek sprays water as Socceroos stars celebrate World Cup appearance in Qatar

Aussie players run to celebrate with Redmayne after saving sudden death kick

Aussie players run to celebrate with Redmayne after saving sudden death kick

Peruvian players look crestfallen after missing out on a World Cup spot this winter

Peruvian players look crestfallen after missing out on a World Cup spot this winter

Australian defender Bailey Wright celebrates on the pitch after a hard-fought encounter

Australian defender Bailey Wright celebrates on the pitch after a hard-fought encounter

“I’m not going to take credit for it,” Redmayne said.

“The boys ran there for 120 minutes. It’s teamwork. I am not a hero. I just played my part like everyone else did tonight.

“This idea came up during pre-screening that this (shootout) could happen under these kinds of circumstances.”

“At the end of the day, it’s a flip side. Either right or left.

“I’m so proud of the players,” added Socceroos boss Graham Arnold.

“Really no one knows what these boys went through to get here, it was so tough, the whole countryside. The way they held on, the way they committed, awesome.

Last week's Socceroos hero Ajdin Hrustic is challenged by Renato Tapia (R) in the first half

Last week’s Socceroos hero Ajdin Hrustic is challenged by Renato Tapia (R) in the first half

The Australians' Martin Boyle (R) was their most dangerous player in the first half of a close encounter

The Australians’ Martin Boyle (R) was their most dangerous player in the first half of a close encounter

Australian Martin Boyle had missed his first penalty but they converted the next five to silence the thousands of Peruvian fans who had traveled for the game and provided raucous support but saw their side create few chances.

Instead, a professional Australia dominated the early exchanges, with winger Boyle twice cutting through the Peruvian defense to provide teasing crosses.

The second half followed a similar pattern to the first with limited effort on goal until the 80th minute when Australia suddenly had three good chances to win the game.

Luis Advincula (L) showed blistering pace to edge past Mathew Leckie in the first half

Luis Advincula (L) showed blistering pace to edge past Mathew Leckie in the first half

Peruvian supporters outnumbered Australian supporters and created a lively atmosphere in Doha, Qatar

Peruvian supporters outnumbered Australian supporters and created a lively atmosphere in Doha, Qatar

Ajdin Hrustic’s tame free-kick was easily saved by Peru captain Pedro Gallese and five minutes later Aziz Behich made two tackles and suddenly found himself in front of goal but narrowly missed as he was trying to wrap his shot in the net.

Then a run down the left from Australian substitute Awer Mabil saw him slip the ball into Hrustic’s path but he didn’t have enough power on his shot and Gallese saved again.

Nine minutes after extra time, Australia’s Mathew Ryan was finally tested by a stinging shot from Edison Flores which the goalkeeper saved.

Flores then headed for the post as the South Americans found some extra gear in the closing stages, but they were still unable to settle the result after two hours, setting the stage for Redmayne to become a hero.

Socceroos captain and No.1 goalkeeper Mathew Ryan was replaced in extra time by Redmayne

Socceroos captain and No.1 goalkeeper Mathew Ryan was replaced in extra time by Redmayne

Peru coach Ricardo Gareca said: “We had hopes of doing it, we were close but unfortunately it wasn’t.

“We are flooded with pain. We gave the maximum. They’ve emptied their tanks and we feel cheated we’re out of the World Cup. We wanted to avoid penalties.

The one-game play-off between fifth-placed Asian and South American qualifiers determined 31st place at this year’s World Cup.

On Tuesday, the last place in the final will be decided when Costa Rica and New Zealand face off in their intercontinental play-off, also at the Ahmad bin Ali Stadium.

Did you miss the action? Check the live blog for all the play-by-play updates from the World Cup play-off clash between Australia and Peru…

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Graduate college athletes reflect on past four tumultuous years in Big Green sports https://divegearjp.com/graduate-college-athletes-reflect-on-past-four-tumultuous-years-in-big-green-sports/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 06:04:20 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/graduate-college-athletes-reflect-on-past-four-tumultuous-years-in-big-green-sports/ Several graduate athletes have expressed dissatisfaction with only two or three full competitive seasons during their time at Dartmouth, although some have noted silver linings. by Caroline York | 18 minutes ago This article is featured in the special issue Commencement & Reunions 2022. Two years into the COVID-19 pandemic – which led to the […]]]>

Several graduate athletes have expressed dissatisfaction with only two or three full competitive seasons during their time at Dartmouth, although some have noted silver linings.

by Caroline York | 18 minutes ago

This article is featured in the special issue Commencement & Reunions 2022.

Two years into the COVID-19 pandemic – which led to the cancellation of all Ivy League college athletic competitions between spring 2020 and Spring 2021 – graduating athletes and administrators reflected on an unprecedented time in the history of Dartmouth varsity sports teams.

Several graduate athletes shared their sadness at having lost one or more of their competitive seasons. While graduating athletes competing in fall season sports have lost their junior year competitive seasons, graduating athletes who competed in the spring lost both their second and junior year competitive seasons.

Baseball team member Justin Murray ’22 said when the Ivy League announced the 2020 fall season — and later the entire 2020-2021 season — would be postponed, he didn’t feel surprised. but disappointed.

“In my eyes, the Ivy League [conference] does not understand the importance of sport for [athletes]”, Murray said. “Dartmouth offers a great education, but without the sport some of us would have gone elsewhere to play our sport.”

Acting sporting director Peter Roby ’79 expressed his ‘respect’ for the Ivy League and Dartmouth’s decision to approach the pandemic with great caution. He added that the Ivy League aims to treat athletes the same as the rest of the student population.

“Athletes are not treated differently [when it comes to] where they live on campus, what they study and in admissions,” Roby said. “It was hard to rationalize by treating them differently when it came to [COVID-19] strict protocols for all students.

In July 2020, the College announced that it To cut the men’s and women’s golf teams, the men’s light rowing team and the men’s and women’s swimming and diving teams. The College cited increased flexibility in admissions and financial challenges — in particular, budget constraints due to the pandemic — as the reason for the cuts.

Ashley Post ’22, a member of the varsity women’s swim team, said her team argued for the reinstatement of those teams until a trial, citing the cuts violated Title IX, brought the five return teams in January 2021.

“When the team was taken down, we stopped training for a while, but came back into the pool when we were reinstated,” Post said. “Go through [COVID-19] and being cut made us closer because we were working with alumni to bring the team back.

During the 2020-2021 school year, the College exploited to about half of its normal capacity of students to combat the spread of COVID-19. Since only two classes were given priority on campus at a time, Murray said it was difficult to foster cohesive team dynamics with only about half the team present and able to train together for this period.

Murray added that he felt there was a lack of connection between the different classes until all four classes returned to campus for the first time in the fall of 2021.

Some graduating athletes said they felt the underclassmen had an increased sense of responsibility when training and competing this year, as they had to make up for their lack of competition experience at the collegiate level.

“The freshmen and sophomores have really come up this year,” said men’s hockey captain Harrison Markell ’22. “I think [Clay Stevenson ’24] was our most valuable player, and he was able sign a contract with the NHL with the Capitals even after missing his first season.

Some teams showed significant improvement after the pandemic. Baseball has gone from a loss record from 15-26 in 2019 to one winner 2022 season from 24-19. Softball saw a similar trend, going from 13 to 27 in 2019 to an improvement 20-24 record in 2022. Women’s tennis has gone 4-17 in 2019, but they went out 7-13 in 2022.

Markell said that while some of his team’s wins and losses weren’t what the team would have wanted them to be, he believes his teammates trained through tremendous adversity and came out stronger after went through difficult times.

Equestrian team captain Claire Azar ’22 said a silver lining during the pandemic was that she had gained a new appreciation for horseback riding.

“My junior year we had practice but it was very laid back,” Azar said. “I actually enjoyed it because it was…nice to take a break from [the sport] to be competitive and I rediscovered the pleasure of riding.

According to softball team member Madie Augusto ’22, the break from competition has rekindled many of her teammates’ enjoyment of the sport. However, she said the time off also gives athletes time to consider whether being a collegiate athlete is really for them.

“Without the pandemic, [some players] would have pushed through, which would have had an impact on the culture [negatively]”, Augusto said. “It gave the players time to think about whether the game was for them – by the 2022 season, everyone on the team was bought one thousand percent. [into the sport].”

Azar said that because the NCAA has extended eligibility rules due to the pandemic, she plans to compete for Dartmouth again in the fall.

Roby said he was grateful for all the hard work the graduating athletes have put in over the past four years and especially for their efforts during their final seasons representing the Big Green.

“I want to thank all the seniors for how they’ve been through tough times over the last few years, for the faith they had in the college, in each other, in the coaches [and] in sports administration to get back to doing what they love to do,” Roby said. “Hopefully they appreciate what they’ve been through and what they’ve done to stay focused and resilient – I think that’s the silver lining.”

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Calgary’s Aimee Wilson rediscovers love of diving https://divegearjp.com/calgarys-aimee-wilson-rediscovers-love-of-diving/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 02:38:37 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/calgarys-aimee-wilson-rediscovers-love-of-diving/ Breadcrumb Links Sports Other sports Olympic Games Calgary diver Aimee Wilson trains at the MNP Sports and Community Center for the FINA Diving Grand Prix Canada Cup. The event runs until Sunday. Photo by GAVIN YOUNG /Postmedia Content of the article The smile Aimee Wilson wears these days is proof that she truly loves her […]]]>

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The smile Aimee Wilson wears these days is proof that she truly loves her chosen sport.

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The thing is, the Calgarian is diving headlong into becoming a world-class athlete like never before.

“I’m happy,” Wilson said ahead of the FINA Diving Grand Prix Canada Cup, which runs through Sunday at the MNP Sports and Community Center in Calgary. “I just feel like I’m more mature and my diving has improved a lot. I’m so much more consistent. And I’m just happier.

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“Before, I didn’t know if I was going to keep diving for the next Olympic cycle.”

Now?

Well… she appears to be reborn, thanks to a major life decision – another for the 22-year-old trying to find her diving rhythm.

She has six years to go from Calgary to Toronto to pursue her diving dreams, after which she headed south to get an education in the state and make a name for herself with the NCAA team LSU Tigers.

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And then, two years ago, Wilson went west to join the NCAA’s Texas A&M Aggies – a move that made all the difference in the world under the guidance of diving coach Jay Lerew.

She says he understands her as an athlete, with happiness having become the biggest benefit of this transfer to the Southeastern Conference.

“I’ve definitely found that at Texas A&M – it’s a really happy and healthy environment,” said Wilson, who admitted to looking for a different workout and an improved team atmosphere at- beyond LSU. “I really blossomed in the pool, personally and mentally too.

“Plus, you can compete a lot more, which I think is really awesome,” continued Wilson, who is studying anthropology and will be graduating from Texas A&M in December. “You compete almost every weekend in the NCAA, which gives you a lot more competitive experience, and I think that has really helped me compete better and more consistently.

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“Being at Texas A&M, I found a new love for the sport, and that love just made diving more enjoyable. I dived better, so I can definitely see myself diving longer than I previously thought I would. I’m excited. I can’t wait to see what this cycle will bring.

His renewed passion is even higher with this week’s international meet in his hometown, where 68 of the world’s best divers – representing eight countries – challenge each other in the only Canadian leg of the 2022 Grand Prix series.

It includes a chance for Wilson to team up with decorated Canadian diver Pamela Ware, Pan Am Games gold medalist and 3-metre springboard Olympian.

“We decided to team up in synchro just a few days ago,” said Wilson, who also specializes in the 3m springboard discipline. “It’s a test right now – first time, first try here. So we’ll see how it goes.

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“It’s crazy actually,” Wilson continued of competing with her 29-year-old Quebec teammate. “It’s crazy because I’ve looked up to Pamela since I was 12. So diving next to her is kind of surreal. I’m trying to calm down and not put too much pressure on myself. But I’m really excited – we’re really good friends. I’m just excited to see how it goes.

Here’s how it went on the first day of Thursday’s Grand Prix:

• Men’s 3m Open — Brazil’s Rafael Fogaca, Britain’s Daniel Goodfellow and Canada’s Bryden Hattie finished first, second and third respectively in the Group A semi-final to advance to the weekend’s final, and Britain’s Jordan Houlder, Canada’s Bjorn Markentin and Jamaica’s Tona Knight-Wisdom finished first, second and third respectively in Group B of the semi-final to advance to the weekend finals. Canadians Laurent Gosselin-Paradis finished fourth in Bracket A, while Cebric Fofana finished fifth in Game B.

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• Women’s Open Platform – Brazil’s Ingrid Oliveira, Canada’s Celina Toth and America’s Bailee Sturgill finished first, second and third respectively in the Group A semi-final to advance to the weekend’s final, and Britain’s Lois Toulson, America’s Janie Boyle and Britain’s Robin Birch finished first, second and third respectively in Group B of the semi-final to advance to the weekend’s finals. Katelyn Fung finished fourth in Group A, while Renee Batalla finished sixth in Contest B.

“For me, I just try to get five consistent dives,” added Wilson, who was able to dive at the MNP center during the COVID-19 lockdown. “I’m looking to compete for myself and also have fun – that’s the most important part.”

Keep it up happy indeed.

tsaelhof@postmedia.com

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Florida leads the Class of 2023 in verbal commitments with 17, including 8 in the top 20 https://divegearjp.com/florida-leads-the-class-of-2023-in-verbal-commitments-with-17-including-8-in-the-top-20/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 21:53:47 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/florida-leads-the-class-of-2023-in-verbal-commitments-with-17-including-8-in-the-top-20/ We’re about a year into the recruiting cycle for the high school class of 2023, and so far the University of Florida men’s and women’s swim and dive teams lead the nation with 17 verbal commitments for the fall 2023. Eight of the student-athletes are ranked among the top 20 recruits of the class of […]]]>

We’re about a year into the recruiting cycle for the high school class of 2023, and so far the University of Florida men’s and women’s swim and dive teams lead the nation with 17 verbal commitments for the fall 2023. Eight of the student-athletes are ranked among the top 20 recruits of the class of 2023 on our respective girls’ and boys’ lists. Additionally, the head coach Antoine Nesty earned verbal endorsements from both No. 1 swimmers, Bella Sims and Scotty Buff. The women’s team will also include Julia Podkoscielny (#10), Michaela Mattes (#12), JoJo Ramey (#15), Catie Choate, Carly Meeting, Lainy Kruger, Grace Rainey, Alex Mitchell and Melissa Cowen; the men will welcome Jonny Marshall (#10), Caleb Maldari (#16), Andrew Taylor (#20), Josh Parent, Aleksas Savickas and Evan Keogh.

Auburn is trailing the Gators with 15 verbals (Andrew Billitto, Liam Heary, Avery Henke, Britton Spann, Harrison Ranier, Josh Noll, Lawson Ficken, Aislyn Barnett, Carissa Rinard, Katie Russell, Maggie McGuire, Michelle Kaner, Morgan Carteaux, Olivia Dinehart, Wyllo Hanson). The Tigers were first out with a number of commitments last fall.

NC State got 14 verbal commitments, including from No. 9 Hudson Williams and No. 13 Chase Mueller. Other pledges came from Jerry Fox, Mitchell Ledford, Will Heck, Henry Lee, JR Taylor, Sam Flack, Teagan Steinmetz, Abby Woolford, Hayley Clark, Keelan Cotter, Sienna Golembiewski and Tyler Driscoll.

Kentucky, which won an SEC women’s conference title last year, eliminated 12 verbals (AJ Abram, Lance Johnson, Alex Ochsenbein, Joshua Fisher, Elizabeth Tilt, Cassie Howell, Libby Grether, Lillie Boggs, Lily DeLong, Madi McGlothen, Megan Hutchins and Paige Housman).

As with the Class of 2022, the Southeastern Conference is leading the way, garnering 80 pledges to date. The Big Ten Conference (54) and Atlantic Coast Conference (51) are alone at the top tier, while the Pacific-12 Conference (21), Big 12 Conference (14) and Ivy League (13) are the only others with double-digit commitments.

We’ve written over 250 articles about prospective student-athletes in the Class of 2022 who have verbally committed to swimming or diving as part of a college program. (To note: We have about 150 more people on our waiting list, and we’re getting there as fast as we can.) Below are all of the articles we’ve published to date on the High School Class of 2023 verbal commitments. As always, you can sort by club team, college, conference, home state, school, LSC, etc (We add articles every day, so keep refreshing this page for the latest articles!)

(NOTE: If you have an engagement to report, please email with a photo (landscape or horizontalseems best) and a quote to [email protected]. Don’t leave it in the comments below.)

SwimSwam Verbal Commitments Database – Class of 2023

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Former CDO Star and Arizona Commitment Kiko Romero Named NJCAA World Series MVP https://divegearjp.com/former-cdo-star-and-arizona-commitment-kiko-romero-named-njcaa-world-series-mvp/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 03:44:52 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/former-cdo-star-and-arizona-commitment-kiko-romero-named-njcaa-world-series-mvp/ (Family photo) Remarkable ancient Canyon del Oro Kiko Romero hit .407 in the NJCAA World Series with 6 home runs and 11 RBIs to help lead Central Arizona to the NJCAA World Series National Championship on Saturday. Romero was named the NJCAA World Series Tournament MVP, Outstanding Offensive Player, and All-Tournament Team Member. Romero went […]]]>
(Family photo)

Remarkable ancient Canyon del Oro Kiko Romero hit .407 in the NJCAA World Series with 6 home runs and 11 RBIs to help lead Central Arizona to the NJCAA World Series National Championship on Saturday.

Romero was named the NJCAA World Series Tournament MVP, Outstanding Offensive Player, and All-Tournament Team Member.

Romero went .467 with 12 homers in the playoffs. Romero has signed up to play for the University of Arizona.

This list will be updated throughout the year with the aim of recognizing all former homegrown prep stars who have achieved academic and/or athletic awards at the next level. These are not high school awards, but college and professional recognition. NOT CHAMPIONSHIPS. If you know of anything I missed along the way, please let me know. amoralesmytucson@yahoo.com

Excerpts from the press release.

82 athletes were recognized for 2022 – we had 207 athletes recognized in 2021.

Kiko Romero/Baseball
Canyon del Oro/Central Arizona
All-ACCAC First Team (5/3)
First Team All-Region I, Division I (5/3)
Gold Glove (5/3)
NJCAA World Series Tournament MVP (6/4)
NJCAA World Series Most Outstanding Offensive Player (6/4)
NJCAA World Series Tournament Team (6/4)

Nate Baez/Baseball
Ironwood Ridge / ASU
Pac-12 Player of the Week (5/9)
Collegiate Baseball 3rd Team All-American (6/2)

Kyle Crookes/Baseball
Canyon del Oro / Central Missouri Coach
MIAA Coach of the Year (5/5)
NCBWA D-II Central Region Coach of the Year (5/19)
NCBWA D-II Coach of the Year (6/2)

Yannira Acuna/Softball
Salpointe/ASU
Pac-12 Player of the Week (3/28)
USA Softball Top 25 Finalist (4/20)
Pac-12 First Team (5/11)
CoSIDA NCAA District 8 Academic (5/11)
NFCA DI West Region First Team (5/19)
NFCA DI Second Team All-American (6/1)

Allie Skaggs/Softball
Ironwood Ridge/Arizona
Pac-12 Player of the Week (4/25)
Additional National Player of the Week (5/3)
Nominated for Pac-12 Player of the Week (5/9)
Pac-12 second team (5/11)
NFCA DI West Region First Team (5/19)
NFCA DI Second Team All-American (6/1)

Ellessa Bonström/Softball
Canyon del Oro/Utah
Pac-12 First Team (5/11)
CoSIDA NCAA District 8 Academic (5/11)
NFCA DI Pacific First Team (5/19)
NFCA DI Third Team All-American (6/1)

Emily Darwin/softball
Benson/Yavapai
ACCAC pitcher of the week (3/21)
ACCAC pitcher of the week (4/11)
First Team All-ACCAC (5/9)
ACCAC DI All Regions (5/9)
NFCA NJCAA DI West Second Team (5/30)

Brianna Hardy/softball
Buena/Phoenix College
NJCAA Most Decorated Athlete (3/31)
First Team All-ACCAC (5/9)
ACCAC D-II all regions (5/9)
NFCA NJCAA D-II South 1st Team (5/30)

Ashley Bradford/Softball
Sahuaro Mesa/Colorado
RMAC Player of the Year (5/6)
RMAC First Team (5/6)
NFCA D-II South Central Second Team (5/11)
D2CAA Second Team All-American (5/27)

John Michael González/Baseball
Empire/Rainy River
MCAC North All-Division (5/13)
MCAC All-State First Team (5/24)
All Region XIII First Team (5/24)

Gabriel Soto/Baseball
Catalina Foothills/Mesabi Range College
MCAC North All-Division (5/13)
MCAC All-State Third Team (5/24)
Third Team in All Region XIII (5/24)

Jayce Cunha / Wrestling
Mountain View/Embry-Riddle
NWCA NAIA Scholar All-American (4/25)

Christian Rodriguez/Baseball
Catalina Foothills/North Central
All UMAC conferences (5/17)

Delaney Schnell/Diving
Tucson/Arizona
Pac-12 diver of the encounter (2/26)
Pac-12 Diver of the Year (4/4)
Pac-12 Winter Academic Honor Roll (4/28)
NCAA DI CoSIDA District 8 (5/19)

Jaida Olson/Athletics
Pusch/Pima Ridge
NJCAA All-American: Pole Vault (3/5)
NJCAA All-American: Pole Vault (5/19)

Reece Gardner/Athletics
Marana/Pima
NJCAA All-American: Heptathlon (3/5)
Aztec Student-Athlete of the Week (3/8)
NJCAA All-American: Pole Vault (5/19)

Carlie Scupin/softball
Tucson/Arizona
Arizona Sophomore of the Year (4/18)
NFCA DI West Region Second Team (5/19)

Sydney Grey/Softball
Sabino/Nebraska, Lincoln
3rd Team NFCA DI Midwest (5/19)

Jessie Niegocki/softball
Mountain view/Horseman
MAAC Pitcher of the Week (4/5)
All-MAAC First Team (5/11)
NFCA DI NE Region First Team (5/19)

Izzy Pacho/Softball
Ironwood Ridge/Arizona
NFCA DI West Region First Team (5/19)

Halle Morris/Softball
Canyon del Oro/Utah
Utah All A’S reception (3/29)
NFCA DI Pacific Third Team (5/19)

Cassie Castaneda/Softball
Sabino/North Dakota
Summit League Team of All Tournaments (5/16)

Mateo Sierras/Baseball
Tucson/Rainy River
MCAC North All-Division (5/13)

Robby Campillo/softball
Christian from Salpointe/Arizona
CoSIDA NAIA District 4 Academic (5/11)

Katie Faulk/Softball
Marana/Utah
Utah All as reception (3/29)
Pac-12 Defensive Team (5/11)

Mia Trejo/Softball
Tucson/UNLV
Mountain West Second Team (5/8)

Lauren Wedman/Softball
Sahuaro Mesa/Colorado
RMAC Second Team (5/6)

Aleena Alexander/Softball
Salpointe/Embry-Riddle
Cal Pac All-Academic Spring Team (5/4)

Vanessa Brink/Balloon-molle
Empire/Embry-Riddle
Cal Pac Pitcher of the Week (3/14)
Cal Pac Pitcher of the Year (5/4)
All-Cal Pac Softball Team (5/9)

Faith Orton/Softball
Amphitheatre/Pima
ACCAC Pitcher of the Week (4/25)
All-ACCAC Third Team (5/9)

Kelli Samorano/Softball
Tucson/Pima
All-ACCAC Third Team (5/9)

Solymar Navarro/Softball
Sahuarita/Eastern Arizona
Second Team All-ACCAC (5/9)
ACCAC DI all regions (5/9)

Brianna Jackson/Softball
Sahuaro/Chandler-Gilbert
ACCAC D-II Player of the Year (5/9)
ACCAC D-II all regions (5/9)

Kimberly McDaniels/Softball
Salpointe/Franciscan
PAC Freshman of the Week (3/28)
John Lemal MVP Award Finalist (4/21)
PAC Player of the Year (5/10)
First Team All-PAC (5/10)
All-PAC Sportsmanship Team (5/10)

Sierra Gaskill/Softball
Pueblo/Benedictine-Mesa
Nominated to Cal Pac POW (2/28)
All-Cal Pac Softball Team (5/9)

Diana Miranda Montano/softball
Salpointe/Embry-Riddle
All-Cal Pac Softball Team (5/9)

Danielle Jamieson/softball
Sahuaro/Embry-Riddle
Cal-Pac Player of the Week (4/4)
All-Cal Pac Softball Team (5/9)

Emma Almodoba/Softball
Ironwood Ridge/Embry Riddle
Honorable Mention All-Cal Pac (5/9)

Preston Clifford/Baseball
Sabino/Pima
All-ACCAC First Team (5/3)
First Team All-Region I, Division I (5/3)

Romeo Ballesteros/Baseball
Salpointe/Pima
Second Team All-ACCAC (5/3)

Treyjen Meza/Baseball
Sahuarita/Cochise
All-ACCAC First Team (5/3)
First Team All-Region I, Division I (5/3)
Gold Glove (5/3)

Madison Courney/Gymnastics
Mountain View/Arizona
Pac-12 Winter Academic Honor Roll (4/28)

Halli Mayberry/Gymnastics
Canyon del Oro/Arizona
Pac-12 Winter Academic Honor Roll (4/28)

MacKinzie Kane/Gymnastics
Emily Gray/Arizona
Pac-12 Winter Academic Honor Roll (4/28)

Ayden Schilb / Indoor Track
Cienega/Arizona
Pac-12 Winter Academic Honor Roll (4/28)

Trevor Volpe / Inside Track
Salpointe/Arizona
Pac-12 Winter Academic Honor Roll (4/28)

Grace Driskill / Inside Track
Rincon/UHS/Arizona
Pac-12 Winter Academic Honor Roll (4/28)

Grace Hala’ufia/Indoor Athletics
Mountain View/Arizona
Pac-12 Winter Academic Honor Roll (4/28)

Wyatt Matson/Swim
Canyon del Oro/Arizona
Pac-12 Winter Academic Honor Roll (4/28)

Tyler Rokop / Wrestling
Ironwood Ridge / ASU
Pac-12 Winter Academic Honor Roll (4/28)

Sam Beskind/Basketball
Catalina/Stanford Foothills
Pac-12 Winter Academic Honor Roll (4/28)

Taylor Alicea-Jorgensen / Swimming
Catalina Foothills/Utah
Pac-12 Winter Academic Honor Roll (4/28)

Brooks Chess/Swim
Catalina Foothills/Arizona
Arizona Outstanding Career (4/18)
Pac-12 Winter Academic Honor Roll (4/28)

Turner Washington/Athletics
Gold Canyon/ASU
West Region Athlete of the Year (3/17)
Bowerman’s Watch List (3/24)
Pac-12 Winter Academic Honor Roll (4/28)

Morgan Gappmayer/Volleyball
Ironwood Ridge/NAU
All-Big Sky Academic Conference (4/21)

Isabelle Almazan/Football
Salpointe North Colorado
All-Big Sky Academic Conference (4/21)

Colin Dreis/Football
Salpointe/Montana
All-Big Sky Academic Conference (4/21)

Harrison Bemiller/Football
Ironwood Ridge/NAU
All-Big Sky Academic Conference (4/21)

Heath Bemiller/Football
Ironwood Ridge/NAU
All-Big Sky Academic Conference (4/21)

Stanley Berryhill III/Football
Mountain View/Arizona
Nominated for Outstanding Career in Arizona (4/18)

Abby Russell/Beach Volleyball
Salpointe/Arizona
Arizona Sophomore of the Year Nominated (4/18)

Alex Parkhurst/Beach Volleyball
Salpointe/Arizona
Arizona Junior of the Year nominee (4/18)

Elise Munoz/Softball
Salpointe/Pima
ACCAC Player of the Week (4/11)

Morgan Nash/Beach Volleyball
Sahuaro/Vanguard
All-GSAC Team

Mitchell Effing/Athletics
Sinking wells / NAU
Big Sky Freshman of the Year (3/4)

Grant Nations/Swim
Sabino/Utah
Utah All as reception (3/29)

Kelsey Siemons/Basketball
Catalina Foothills/Colorado Mesa
RMAC Player of the Week (1/31)
RMAC Varsity Team (1/31)
CoSIDA Academic All-District (2/17)
RMAC 2nd Team All-Conference (3/2)
RMAC Summit Award Winner (3/4)

Jazzy Hughes/Basketball
Mountain View/CSU Pueblo
RMAC Academic Honor Roll (1/31)
RMAC 2nd Team All-Conference (3/2)

Summer Fox/Basketball
Pueblo/Black Hills State
RMAC Academic Honor Roll (1/31)

Conner Verdugo/Basketball
Walden Grove/Embry-Riddle
Cal Pac All-Academic (3/4)

Chase Verdugo/Basketball
Walden Grove/Embry-Riddle
Cal Pac All-Academic (3/4)

Ana Rodriguez/Softball
Tucson/Central Arizona
ACCAC DI pitcher and prisoner of war (3/7)

Joel Gardner/Athletics
Ironwood/Pima Ridge
NJCAA All-American: 5,000 (3/5)

Lucy Chavez/Athletics
Bisbee/Pima
NJCAA All-American: WT (3/5)

Tianna Carter / Basketball
Canyon del Oro/NC Central
MEAC Player of the Week (2/8)

Angel Addleman / Basketball
Palo verde/Pima
ACCAC D-II Player of the Week (1/5)
Second Team All-ACCAC (2/26)
First Team All Regions I, Division II (2/26)

Nikya Orange/Basketball
Green/Pima tank
All-ACCAC Third Team (2/26)
First Team All Regions I, Division II (2/26)

Luisayde Chavez/Basketball
Rio Rico/Pima
All-ACCAC Third Team (2/26)
Second Team All-Region I, Division II (2/26)

Daniel Moody/Basketball
Walden Grove/Pima
Honorable Mention All-ACCAC (2/24)
Second Team All-Region I, Division II (2/24)

Mikayla Santa Cruz/Softball
Canyon del Oro/Creighton
BIG EAST Pitcher of the Week (2/14)
All UTEP Invitational Tournaments (2/14)

Max Hernandez/Volleyball
Tucson/Cornerstone
Golden Eagle Athlete of the Week (2/7)

Kevin Jimenez/Baseball
Nogales/State of New Mexico
PG WAC Pre-Season Team (2/4)

Jack Langan/Baseball
Sabino/Cornell
NCAA D-III SAAC Member (1/27)

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