Underwater – Dive Gear JP http://divegearjp.com/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 02:50:35 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://divegearjp.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon.png Underwater – Dive Gear JP http://divegearjp.com/ 32 32 Underwater tsunamis created by calving glaciers cause vigorous ocean mixing https://divegearjp.com/underwater-tsunamis-created-by-calving-glaciers-cause-vigorous-ocean-mixing/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 20:06:00 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/underwater-tsunamis-created-by-calving-glaciers-cause-vigorous-ocean-mixing/ Scientists from a research vessel in Antarctica observed the disintegration of a glacier’s front and their measurements “exceeded the scale”. In addition to witnessing disturbances on the surface of the ocean, they recorded “internal” underwater tsunamis as high as a house, a phenomenon hitherto ignored in understanding ocean mixing and in computer models. The team, […]]]>

Scientists from a research vessel in Antarctica observed the disintegration of a glacier’s front and their measurements “exceeded the scale”.

In addition to witnessing disturbances on the surface of the ocean, they recorded “internal” underwater tsunamis as high as a house, a phenomenon hitherto ignored in understanding ocean mixing and in computer models.

The team, led by researchers from the British Antarctic Survey (BAS), report their findings today in the journal Science Advances.

Internal tsunamis are an important factor in ocean mixing, which affects life in the ocean, temperatures at different depths, and the amount of ice the ocean can melt.

Ice in Antarctica flows towards the coast along glacier-filled valleys.

While some of the ice melts into the ocean, much breaks up into icebergs, which range in size from small chunks to the size of a country.

A team aboard the BAS RRS research vessel James Clark Ross was taking ocean measurements near William Glacier on the Antarctic Peninsula as the front of it disintegrated dramatically into thousands of small pieces.

William Glacier typically has one or two major calving events a year, and the team estimated that this broke off around 78,000 square meters of ice – around the area of ​​10 football pitches – with the front of the glacier rising 40 m above sea level.

Before it broke away, the water temperature was cooler at around 50-100m depth and warmer below.

After calving this changed drastically, with a much more even temperature at different depths.

The study’s lead author, Professor Michael Meredith, Polar Oceans Team Leader at BAS, said: “It was remarkable to see, and we were lucky to be in the right place in the right place. moment.

“Many glaciers end in the sea and their ends regularly split into icebergs.

“It can cause big waves on the surface, but now we know it also creates waves inside the ocean.

“When they break, these internal waves cause the sea to mix, which affects the life in the sea, its heat at different depths, and the amount of ice it can melt.

“It is important for us to better understand.

“The mixing of the oceans influences the location of nutrients in the water and this matters for ecosystems and biodiversity.

“We thought we knew what was causing this mixing – in the summer we thought it was mainly wind and tides, but it never occurred to us that iceberg calving could cause internal tsunamis that would mix things up so substantially.”

Professor James Scourse, head of the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of Exeter, was the lead science officer for RRS James Clark Ross at the time of the calving event, which was captured by a Sky News crew on board at the time. .

Two other Exeter scientists played central roles in interpreting the data captured, Dr Katy Sheen and PhD student Tobias Ehmen from the Center for Geography and Environmental Science on the Penryn Campus.

“Often the most important and exciting discoveries in science happen by chance – you’re in the right place at the right time with the right instruments and the right people – and because you know it’s important, you just make sure you’re there. ‘adjust the work plan to make the most of what nature has given you,’ said Professor Scourse.

“We did this in Börgen Bay in January 2020 and as a result produced the first data on a process that has implications for how fast the ocean is able to melt ice sheets. This has implications for all of us.

Unlike waves caused by wind and tides, tsunamis are caused by geophysical events where water is suddenly displaced, such as by an earthquake or landslide.

Internal tsunamis have been noticed in a handful of locations, caused by landslides.

Until now, no one had noticed that they were happening around Antarctica, probably all the time because of the thousands of glaciers calving there.

Other places with glaciers are likely also affected, including Greenland and elsewhere in the Arctic.

This serendipitous observation and understanding is important because glaciers are set to retreat and calve more as global warming continues.

This could likely increase the number of internal tsunamis created and the mixing they cause.

This process is not accounted for in current computer models that allow us to predict what might happen around Antarctica.

This discovery changes our understanding of how the ocean around Antarctica is mixed and will improve knowledge of what this means for climate, ecosystem and sea level rise.

Prof Meredith said: “Our fortuitous timing shows how much more we need to know about these remote environments and their importance to our planet.”

The James Clark Ross RRS research cruise was part of the ICEBERGS project and was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council.

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How to Catch Pokémon Underwater in Pokémon Scarlet and Violet https://divegearjp.com/how-to-catch-pokemon-underwater-in-pokemon-scarlet-and-violet/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 00:23:01 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/how-to-catch-pokemon-underwater-in-pokemon-scarlet-and-violet/ While exploring the vast region of Paldea in Pokemon Scarlet and Purpleyou might have come across some Water-type Pokémon swimming underwater and wondering how the hell you can catch them. After all, there is no fishing mechanic in Pokemon Scarlet and Purple-which was the method to catch underwater Pokemon since Pokemon Red and Blue launched […]]]>

While exploring the vast region of Paldea in Pokemon Scarlet and Purpleyou might have come across some Water-type Pokémon swimming underwater and wondering how the hell you can catch them.

After all, there is no fishing mechanic in Pokemon Scarlet and Purple-which was the method to catch underwater Pokemon since Pokemon Red and Blue launched in 1996.

Rest assured, it’s a simple process. And it can be done from the safety of the shore, or by surfing Koraidon or Miraidon.

Catch Pokémon underwater in Pokemon Scarlet and Purple method explained

To catch Pokémon underwater, simply press the ZL button to lock onto a nearby Pokémon. This will focus the camera on the closest. Then just throw a Poké Ball at it to trigger the battle scene and catch it the same way you catch Pokemon on land.

Ideally, you’ll also want to use a Net Ball, as it increases the likelihood of catching Water-type Pokemon. It’s not necessary, but definitely worth using if you have some to spare.

Using Electric and Grass type will also give you an advantage in combat.

Image via The Pokémon Company

That’s all we can say about it. It’s interesting that Game Freak decided to move away from the tried and tested fishing system. Maybe they felt that wasn’t the best solution given that the games take place in an open world. Either way, it won’t stop you from catching all of the Water-type Pokémon in the Paldea region.

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Global Unmanned Underwater Vehicle Market Expected to Grow $2.4 Billion Between 2022 and 2026 – ResearchAndMarkets.com https://divegearjp.com/global-unmanned-underwater-vehicle-market-expected-to-grow-2-4-billion-between-2022-and-2026-researchandmarkets-com/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 14:19:00 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/global-unmanned-underwater-vehicle-market-expected-to-grow-2-4-billion-between-2022-and-2026-researchandmarkets-com/ DUBLIN–(BUSINESS WIRE)–The report “Global Unmanned Underwater Vehicle Market 2022-2026” has been added to from ResearchAndMarkets.com offer. The Unmanned Underwater Vehicle Market is expected to grow by USD 2.40 billion between 2022 and 2026, accelerating at a CAGR of 14.2% during the forecast period. This Unmanned Underwater Vehicle Market report provides global analysis, market size and […]]]>

DUBLIN–(BUSINESS WIRE)–The report “Global Unmanned Underwater Vehicle Market 2022-2026” has been added to from ResearchAndMarkets.com offer.

The Unmanned Underwater Vehicle Market is expected to grow by USD 2.40 billion between 2022 and 2026, accelerating at a CAGR of 14.2% during the forecast period. This Unmanned Underwater Vehicle Market report provides global analysis, market size and forecast, trends, growth drivers, and challenges, and vendor analysis covering around 25 vendors.

This report offers up-to-date analysis regarding the current global market scenario, latest trends and drivers, and overall market environment. The market is driven by growing demand for stealth platforms, increasing investment in maritime surveillance capabilities and readiness for UUV deployment.

The Unmanned Underwater Vehicle Market analysis includes type segment and geographical landscape.

The publisher’s unmanned underwater vehicle market is segmented as follows:

By type

  • Remote

  • Autonomous submarine

By geographical landscape

  • North America

  • Europe

  • APAC

  • South America

  • Middle East and Africa

This study identifies growing investments in underwater warfare capabilities as one of the major reasons driving the growth of the Unmanned Underwater Vehicles market over the next few years. Additionally, the emergence of 3D printing and composite materials and the advancement of electromagnetic and acoustic sensor technologies will drive significant demand in the market.

The publisher presents a detailed picture of the market through study, synthesis and summation of data from multiple sources by analysis of key parameters. This Unmanned Underwater Vehicle Market report covers the following areas:

  • Unmanned Underwater Vehicle Market Sizing

  • Unmanned Underwater Vehicle Market Forecast

  • Unmanned Underwater Vehicle Market Industry Analysis

Main topics covered:

1. Summary

2 Market landscape

3 Market sizing

4 Five forces analysis

5 Market Segmentation by Vehicle Type

6 Customer Landscape

7 Geographic landscape

8 drivers, challenges and trends

9 Supplier Landscape

10 Vendor Analysis

11 Appendix

Companies cited

  • BAE Systems Plc

  • BaltRobotics Sp.zoo

  • Cellula Robotics Ltd.

  • Copenhagen Subsea AS

  • Fugro S.A.

  • GABRI SRL

  • General Dynamics Corp.

  • Graal Tech Srl

  • Gorge Group SA

  • Hydromea SA

  • International Submarine Engineering Ltd.

  • Kongsberg Gruppen ASA

  • L3Harris Technologies Inc.

  • Lockheed Martin Corp.

  • RTSYS

  • Submarine 7 SA

  • TechnipFMC plc

  • Teledyne Technologies Inc.

  • The Boeing Company.

  • thyssenkrupp AG

For more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/55ybsf

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Global Underwater Exploration Robots Market 2022 to 2028 Data Analysis by Top Players https://divegearjp.com/global-underwater-exploration-robots-market-2022-to-2028-data-analysis-by-top-players/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 04:17:56 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/global-underwater-exploration-robots-market-2022-to-2028-data-analysis-by-top-players/ The Global Underwater Exploration Robots Market from 2022 to 2028 study examines global market trends. MarketandResearch.biz mission is to provide its clients with a global vision of the market and to support them in the implementation of growth strategies. Underwater Exploration Robots provide a projection for the years 2022-2028 based on a thorough and competent […]]]>

The Global Underwater Exploration Robots Market from 2022 to 2028 study examines global market trends. MarketandResearch.biz mission is to provide its clients with a global vision of the market and to support them in the implementation of growth strategies. Underwater Exploration Robots provide a projection for the years 2022-2028 based on a thorough and competent analysis. It focuses on global market characteristics such as important drivers, opportunities, limiting factors, and difficulties. This study will help business strategists to successfully expand into global and regional markets.

Furthermore, the report enables decision makers to make profitable business decisions that will help them achieve long-term viability. It provides detailed and factual analysis of current trends, market dynamics, segmentation analysis, regional analysis and identification of high growth regions, which will help end users to formulate strategies market based on the study’s projections.

DOWNLOAD FREE SAMPLE REPORT: https://www.marketandresearch.biz/sample-request/229096

The study is significant for companies or individuals looking to enter the Underwater Exploration Robots industry, as it provides detailed qualitative and quantitative insights. It also analyzes the impact of developing trends, COVID-19 and inflation on the market growth. In addition, supply chain analysis, profit margin analysis, and price analysis are also covered in detail to help organizations and give them an idea of ​​the amount of capital needed to enter this industry. .

The following application types are covered in the report:

  • Drilling assistance
  • construction aid
  • repair & maintenance

The study covers the following types of products:

The countries covered in the market report are:

  • North America (United States, Canada and Mexico)
  • Europe (Germany, France, UK, Russia, Italy and Rest of Europe)
  • Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, Korea, India, Southeast Asia and Australia)
  • South America (Brazil, Argentina, Colombia and rest of South America)
  • Middle East and Africa (Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Egypt, South Africa and Rest of Middle East and Africa)

Key and emerging players in the global market include:

  • VideoRay
  • Teledyne
  • Eca Group
  • Hiker of the Depths
  • SEAMOR Marine
  • Lighthouse
  • Saab
  • Deep ocean engineering
  • ROBOSEA
  • Blueye Robotics
  • Profondinfar
  • Shenzhen Vxfly
  • Nido Robotics
  • Underwater Technology
  • blue robotics
  • IROV Technologies

ACCESS FULL REPORT: https://www.marketandresearch.biz/report/229096/global-underwater-exploration-robots-market-growth-2022-2028

EXIM, inflation, socio-economic parameters, regulatory framework in different countries, legal, environmental and other micro-factors, such as raw material cost, and political factors, raw material suppliers, etc were taken into consideration to drive the market size on the supply side. The market is assessed from the demand side based on the usage of the type in various industries.

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Flooding persists in Welaka after Tropical Storm Nicole https://divegearjp.com/flooding-persists-in-welaka-after-tropical-storm-nicole/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 04:59:00 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/flooding-persists-in-welaka-after-tropical-storm-nicole/ Some neighbors are nervous, while others say they expected the flooding, but not so much that it would affect their sewage system. PUTNAM COUNTY, Fla. – Flooding is still a problem in the Sportsmans Harbor neighborhood. So much of a problem that their sewage system is shut down. Neighbor Suzanne Carroll describes what her garden […]]]>

Some neighbors are nervous, while others say they expected the flooding, but not so much that it would affect their sewage system.

PUTNAM COUNTY, Fla. – Flooding is still a problem in the Sportsmans Harbor neighborhood. So much of a problem that their sewage system is shut down.

Neighbor Suzanne Carroll describes what her garden looked like after the storm.

“We settled up high, we are at the upper end of the canal, so we had water. When it crosses there is a sidewalk going down the canal so if it goes up the sidewalk we know we have extremely high tides and it was way above the sidewalks for Ian and Nicole,” said Carroll.

Carroll was one of the lucky ones as some neighbors are struggling with their sewers shutting down.

The sewer system operates on a vacuum design and with the high water almost still, it is impossible to clean the sewer lines without them backing up into everyone’s house.

“We weren’t expecting this much, you know, we had just come back when Ian came in and we had a flood here with Ian. When we saw Nicole, we thought it wouldn’t be so bad. It wasn’t a named storm yet. It hadn’t reached hurricane status, and what was different about this storm was the width of the wind band,” neighbor Ted Yoho said.

To help neighbors, Friday afternoon FEMA brought portable toilets and showers to the neighborhood for those in need.

“You know, it’s temporary and there’s a price to pay for living on the river. You know some of these things are happening, you want to tone them down as much as you can with things like the FEMA trailer,” Yoho said.

Welaka Mayor Jamie Watts said the sewage system may not be restored for weeks.

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Korea is developing an underwater cutting training simulator: Waste & Recycling https://divegearjp.com/korea-is-developing-an-underwater-cutting-training-simulator-waste-recycling/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 15:06:07 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/korea-is-developing-an-underwater-cutting-training-simulator-waste-recycling/ November 10, 2022 The Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials (KIMM) has developed a remote virtual dismantling system to teach the use of lasers and plasma to cut the internal components of the underwater reactor vessel (RVI) during the dismantling of nuclear power plants. The nuclear reactor decommissioning training simulator (Image: KKIM) KIMM said the […]]]>

November 10, 2022

The Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials (KIMM) has developed a remote virtual dismantling system to teach the use of lasers and plasma to cut the internal components of the underwater reactor vessel (RVI) during the dismantling of nuclear power plants.

The nuclear reactor decommissioning training simulator (Image: KKIM)

KIMM said the simulator allows operators to simulate underwater laser and plasma cutting and operate the equipment under conditions similar to the actual decommissioning environment by “virtualizing the remote nuclear decommissioning system”.

The research team has built a database containing the results of underwater laser and plasma cutting experiments and the numerical analysis of the behavior of the molten pool based on equipment and materials that simulate the environment of underwater cutting by modeling the RVI of unit 1 of the Kori nuclear power plant. The 576 MWe pressurized water reactor was definitively shut down in June 2017, thus becoming the first South Korean reactor to enter dismantling.

In addition, the KIMM team developed a remote cutting simulation algorithm for an underwater robot, and virtualized radiological elements based on dynamic analysis. Researchers also created a physical environment to perform real underwater cutting with the development of an optimal dismantling process scenario in light of the RVI cutting image and radioactivity.

KIMM noted that the existing simulator produced in South Korea simulated underwater cutting during nuclear power plant decommissioning based on the design of the plant being decommissioned, so it was of limited use in setting implementation of the physical phenomenon in case of real cutting.

The simulator developed by KIMM displays the underwater cutting robot and the cut image that occurs during underwater laser and plasma cutting. It is a simulator which puts into practice a physical phenomenon by considering the virtualization of radiological elements and which allows the remote training of dismantling operators.

“The Busan Center at KIMM hopes to help set up the simulation training facilities for nuclear decommissioning, as the center is located near the Kori nuclear power plant, so that the nuclear decommissioning research institute and our center can cooperate more effectively,” said Jeong Suh, senior researcher at Busan Machinery Research Center of KIMM. “We will lay the foundation for the development of the best remote dismantling system in the world.”

KIMM, founded in 1976, is a government-funded non-profit research institute under the Ministry of Science and ICT.

In September 2017, the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute announced that it had signed contracts with several domestic companies to develop technologies for dismantling Kori 1. These included Kepco Plant Service & Engineering and Doosan, among other things, to develop technologies for dismantling facilities and equipment.

In May 2021, Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power applied to the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission for permission to dismantle Kori 1.

Research and writing by World Nuclear News



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Comprehensive Analysis of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles https://divegearjp.com/comprehensive-analysis-of-autonomous-underwater-vehicles/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 10:44:00 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/comprehensive-analysis-of-autonomous-underwater-vehicles/ Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) Market Analysis 2022 Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) Market Study 2022-2027: Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) Market (Newly Released Report) which covers Market Overview, Future Economic Impact, Competition by Manufacturers, Supply (Production) and Consumption Analysis, and focuses on various products and other market trends. The Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) Industry Market research report […]]]>

Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) Market Analysis 2022

Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) Market Study 2022-2027:

Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) Market (Newly Released Report) which covers Market Overview, Future Economic Impact, Competition by Manufacturers, Supply (Production) and Consumption Analysis, and focuses on various products and other market trends.

The Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) Industry Market research report provides a comprehensive study of the various techniques and materials used in the production of the Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) market product. Starting from industry chain analysis to cost structure analysis, the report analyzes several aspects, including production and end-use segments of the products of the Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV) market. The latest industry trends have been detailed in the report to measure their impact on the production of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV) market product.

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Major Key Players of Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) Market are-
Saab Group, ECA Group, Oceanserver Technology, Inc., Teledyne Gavia, Kongsberg Maritime, Fugro NV, Boston Engineering Corporation, Bluefin Robotics Corporation, Atlas Elekronik Group GmbH, International Submarine Engineering (ISE) Ltd

The results of recent scientific endeavors towards the development of new Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) products were studied. Nevertheless, the factors affecting the major industry players to adopt synthetic supply of market products have also been studied in this statistical survey report. The findings provided in this report are of great value to major industry players. Every organization involved in the global production of the Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV) market products has been mentioned in this report, to study the information on cost-effective manufacturing methods, competitive landscape and new application avenues. .

Types of products:
Shallow AUVs
Medium AUVs
Large AUVs

Based on the app:
petroleum gas
Oceanography
Military & Defense

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This report also includes expansion, mergers and acquisitions, as well as price, revenue, and production. This report also provides the manufacturer’s revenue, CAGR, and production share.

1) Different scenarios of the overall market have been profiled in this report, providing a roadmap of how Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV) products have secured their place in this fast-paced market. Industry players can reform their strategies and approaches by reviewing the market size predictions mentioned in this report. Profitable marketplaces for Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) Market have been revealed, which may affect the global expansion strategies of leading organizations. However, each manufacturer has been described in detail in this research report.

2) The Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV) Market Effect Drivers Analysis chapter precisely highlights the technological advancement/risk, substitution threats, consumer needs/market changes. customer preferences, technological advancements in the related industry, and economic/political environmental changes that attract market growth factors.

3) Fastest and slowest growing market segments are given in the study to give a meaningful insight into each central element of the market. The new players in the market are beginning their trading and accelerating their transition into the Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) market. Merger and acquisition activity is expected to change the market landscape of this industry.

This report is accompanied by a suite of additional Excel data sheets taking quantitative data from all the numerical forecasts presented in the report.

Regional Analysis For Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) Market

North America (United States, Canada and Mexico)
Europe (Germany, France, UK, Russia and Italy)
Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, Korea, India and Southeast Asia)
South America (Brazil, Argentina, Colombia, etc.)
Middle East and Africa (Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Egypt, Nigeria and South Africa)

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Offer Content: The report provides in-depth insights into the usage and adoption of Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) industries across various applications, types and regions/countries. In addition, key stakeholders can learn about key trends, investments, drivers, vertical player initiatives, government efforts towards product acceptance in the coming years, and present commercial product information. on the market.

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The ocean is full of “hope spots” that need to be protected https://divegearjp.com/the-ocean-is-full-of-hope-spots-that-need-to-be-protected/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 15:49:00 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/the-ocean-is-full-of-hope-spots-that-need-to-be-protected/ A version of this story appeared in CNN’s science bulletin Wonder Theory. To receive it in your inbox, Register for free here. CNN — The ocean may be our best hope in the fight against the climate crisis, but it needs our help. Due to its vast expanse, the ocean is able to capture at […]]]>

A version of this story appeared in CNN’s science bulletin Wonder Theory. To receive it in your inbox, Register for free here.



CNN

The ocean may be our best hope in the fight against the climate crisis, but it needs our help.

Due to its vast expanse, the ocean is able to capture at least 25% of the carbon dioxide released by humans into the atmosphere.

The underwater world below the waves can trap carbon for thousands or even millions of years. This “blue carbon” is much more efficient than the carbon captured by plants and trees.

But such an impressive capability cannot be expected to continue without protecting the sea itself, experts on CNN’s Earth Appeal said on Thursday. Scientists suggest stopping fishing and mining in large areas of the ocean, restoring ecosystems like coral reefs and preventing pollution from entering waterways.

If the warming ocean in its current state is able to do its part to save the planet, a healthier ocean could have an even bigger impact, experts say.

The ocean is full of hope. Just ask the Queen of the Deep herself, Sylvia Earle.

The 87-year-old oceanographer has spent much of his life exploring the ocean and still holds the world record for deepest free-walking on the seabed.

“Every time I go in the water, I see things I’ve never seen before,” she said.

Its Mission Blue program, which supports ocean research and restoration, has identified more than 140 marine areas around the world that are critical to revitalizing the ocean. Referred to as Hope Spots, these special sites are guarded by local communities and institutions.

Gray nurse sharks may look menacing with their ragged, needle-like teeth, but a 16-year-old marine ecologist from Port Macquarie in Australia would disagree.

“They are so docile and curious,” said Shalise Leesfield, who works to protect critically endangered species. “They are like the Labradors of the sea.”

The slow-moving sharks, which feed on stingrays, sea urchins and other bottom dwellers, still inhabit Fish Rock, a colorful, coral-filled underwater cavern off South West Rocks, 40 miles up the coast from his house. . Thanks to Leesfield, the cave ecosystem has been named Hope Spot.

It aims to establish a sanctuary zone to ensure that sharks, which are largely harmless to humans, can continue to reproduce and survive.

The sun appears to be smiling in a new image taken by NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory.

Here is the sun, and it is happy to see you.

NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory captured what appears to be a smile on our star from its vantage point in space. Some social media users thought it looked like the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man from “Ghostbusters”, but the dark spots are actually called coronal holes.

These holes in the surface of the sun can release powerful currents of solar wind, or charged particles, which can reach Earth. And that’s something we could see more of as the sun’s activity intensifies before reaching solar maximum in 2025.

Meanwhile, astronomers have spotted a “planet killer” asteroid lurking in the sun’s glare, and it has the potential to cross paths with Earth in the future. The space rock is the largest potentially dangerous asteroid discovered in the past eight years.

“Compostable plastic” is not as planet-friendly as it seems.

Bags, cups, plates and cutlery touted as biodegradable alternatives to harmful single-use plastic items are unregulated – and a new study has found that 60% of products labeled as compostable don’t fully decompose.

Instead, keep reusable containers handy, like mugs or bottles for drinks on the go. And if you see two versions of the same product with different packaging, opt for cardboard rather than plastic.

Want more ideas on how to minimize your role in the climate crisis and reduce your eco-anxiety? Sign up for CNN’s limited series of Life, But Greener newsletters.

Two casts of an ancient marine reptile fossil have been paired with an 1819 drawing (top).

The strange tale of an ancient creature was just beginning when, in 1818, fossil collector Mary Anning unearthed an unusual specimen in southwest England.

She found the first complete skeleton of a prehistoric marine reptile named ichthyosaur, and her discovery helped spark a fledgling field called paleontology. But the fossil was destroyed in a World War II bombing.

A chance discovery by two researchers revealed two unknown plaster casts of the skeleton hidden in the vaults of the museum – one in the United States and the other in Germany.

The casts, which preserve precious details of a priceless fossil once thought to be lost forever, date back to a time two decades before the word dinosaur was even used.

These intriguing stories will capture your interest:

— The eruption of the Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai submarine volcano in January threw a huge plume of ash and water so high it reached the third layer of the Earth’s atmosphere.

– Incredibly rare archaeological evidence unearthed in Finland has revealed that a child may have rested alongside a dog 8,000 years ago in a Stone Age burial site.

– The South Taurids meteor shower will send bright fireballs across the night sky this weekend. Here’s everything you need to know about how to watch.

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Ron Howard’s Cave Rescue movie needed over 800 VFX shots including 350 just for underwater footage https://divegearjp.com/ron-howards-cave-rescue-movie-needed-over-800-vfx-shots-including-350-just-for-underwater-footage/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 22:11:58 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/ron-howards-cave-rescue-movie-needed-over-800-vfx-shots-including-350-just-for-underwater-footage/ Director Ron Howard is no stranger to working with his VFX supervisors. “Inferno”, “Solo: A Star Wars Story” and “In the Heart of the Sea” all required close collaboration with the VFX team. But her latest film, “Thirteen Lives,” presented her with one of her biggest challenges: filming in caves. In “Thirteen Lives”, Howard knew […]]]>

Director Ron Howard is no stranger to working with his VFX supervisors. “Inferno”, “Solo: A Star Wars Story” and “In the Heart of the Sea” all required close collaboration with the VFX team. But her latest film, “Thirteen Lives,” presented her with one of her biggest challenges: filming in caves.

In “Thirteen Lives”, Howard knew Jason Billington, MPC VFX Supervisor, would be a key collaborator. “I knew Jason was going to be additive, but what interested me the most was that there was a lot of work that I expected, but it wasn’t the work that I thought it would be. we would do.”

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The film chronicles the incredible rescue effort of 12 boys and their soccer coach after exploring Thailand’s Tham Luang cave. A monsoon leaves the boys stranded until divers arrive and attempt to drag them out of the cave, one person at a time.

Howard says, “I didn’t really understand what the challenge of photographing in the caves was going to mean, and I did a lot of underwater work.

From the darkness of the water to the atmosphere inside the cave, Howard’s biggest challenge was the general environment, but that’s where Billington stepped in.

Decorator Molly Hughes built four 100-foot-long water tanks at a warehouse in Australia. Billington says his biggest challenge was how to portray the movement of water amid the story of what the divers went through to save the children, and what role VFX would play.

The questions Billington and the team faced concerned where to use specific simulations. “When a diver’s fin lifts in front of the camera, we went with something that would wash in front of the camera to give us something dramatic, moving away from the fin. Or if a diver swims down the tunnel and hitting his head, we would use that moment to simulate dust and debris falling from that connection.

As Billington worked through the debris and darkness, Howard says he tried to get as much behind closed doors as possible. According to Howard, “When the tank was clearest, we were shooting the widest shots, as it got more cloudy, we got closer to the details.” He adds: “We were also creating current, but there were times when we had to make sure the audience could recognize the speed, rhythm and intensity of that current. What Jason then had to do was with each shot, sculpt in and around what we already had in camera.

Billington warned Howard about what he was capturing behind closed doors. According to Howard, “Jason said they couldn’t take things away. He said: “I can help define the shots and strengthen them, but if it’s too much behind closed doors, I can’t help you.”

The handling was done piecemeal, especially for the water tank moments. If the water was too clear, Billington could speed things up. The key was not to take the audience out of the story.

Howard says, “Once in a while we would actually decide that a plan was working, but there weren’t many of them. However, it would be like a party time in our VFX meetings.

The VFX team also built set extensions, including the master bedroom and exterior entrance.

Billington reveals: “There was the outer exteriors with the entrance they were walking towards, and when they come in – it was built into the side of a hill – it just stopped and ended. We used a black screen for the actors to look down and imagine what was going on down there.

Also, the inner set that was part of the chamber was about 40 miles away, so in scenes where divers or volunteers had to come in and walk around the cave entrance, Billington would sew the two extensions together.

(L to R) Colin Farrell as John Volanthen, Paul Gleeson as Jason Mallison and Thira 'Aum' Chutikul as Commander Kiet in THIRTEEN LIVES, directed by Ron Howard, a Metro Goldwyn Mayer Pictures film.  Credit: Vince Valitutti / Metro Goldwyn Mayer Pictures © 2022 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures Inc. All rights reserved.

The VFX team assembled set extensions and added drops through the caves in post.

Billington says 800 to 900 shots were hit by VFX, and 350 of them were underwater. And while much of that work was done during production, it wasn’t until after the duo realized that something vital was missing from the film: the drops through the cave. “It became a big thing,” Billington reveals.

“We just didn’t think on set that it would be a thing. When we got to editing and put the story together. The water inside the cave was missing, so that was added.

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PEI Underwater Hockey Stars Make a splash at National Tournament https://divegearjp.com/pei-underwater-hockey-stars-make-a-splash-at-national-tournament/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 10:40:42 +0000 https://divegearjp.com/pei-underwater-hockey-stars-make-a-splash-at-national-tournament/ ]]>
L'équipe de hockey sous-marin de l'île a fait sensation lors du tournoi national Nautilus à Sheffield.  <i>(Picture: contributed)</i>” src=”https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/kLN5QK7ObSOUoC90txc78g–/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjt3PTk2MDtoPTYzOQ–/https://media.zenfs.com/en/isle_of_wight_county_press_192/4db345136a48d9ff67aabcc438139958″ data-src= “https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/kLN5QK7ObSOUoC90txc78g–/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjt3PTk2MDtoPTYzOQ–/https://media.zenfs.com/en/isle_of_wight_county_press_192/4db345136a49ab94ff61></div>
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<p><figcaption class=The island’s underwater hockey team caused a stir at the National Nautilus Tournament in Sheffield. (Picture: contributed)

The Isle of Wight Underwater Hockey Club traveled to Sheffield to get a taste of themselves in their first tournament in nine years – but ended up winning gold.

A team of 12 competed in the annual national competition, Nautilus.

Being new to the competition, the team was entered into Division 6, at Ponds Forge International Sports Centre.

“Hopes were high that some goals could be scored over the six games, as well as gaining much-needed competitive experience and performing well enough to be invited back next year,” said Mary Cockayne, on behalf of the club.

Isle of Wight County Press: The Isle of Wight Underwater Hockey team celebrate their success in Sheffield.

The Isle of Wight underwater hockey team celebrate their success in Sheffield. (Picture: contributed)

The opener against Liverpool showed the island were more than ready for the competition – crushing them 11-0.

Over the course of the day, the results continued in the same vein, with victories over Skipton (12-0), Totton (9-0), Kingsbridge Krays (6-1) and Yorkshire (7-0).

The final saw Nottingham – relegated from Division 5 last year – take a 2-0 lead.

But the Islanders were determined to make the most of the opportunity as they battled to come back to 2-2 at halftime.

Isle of Wight County Press: The Division 6 final table at the Nauitilus National Underwater Hockey Tournament in Sheffield.

Isle of Wight County Press: The Division 6 final table at the Nauitilus National Underwater Hockey Tournament in Sheffield.

The Division 6 final table at the Nautilus National Underwater Hockey Tournament in Sheffield. (Picture: contributed)

In the second half, the Island side – based at the Waterside Pool in Ryde – were the dominant force, adding further goals to win 4-2, the title, gold medals and promotion to Division 5 in the second half. next year’s Nautilus event.

“The experience has been amazing,” added the club spokeswoman.

The club aims to register a B team in Division 6 next year.

The Isle of Wight: Cris Iordache and Anna Cockayne (attackers); Matt Guelbert, Charlie Cockayne, Alex Makin, Geoffrey Wroath (capt), James Schofield and Zak Clarke (middle); Lawrence Schofield, Kevin Dannet, Chris Thearle and Peter Wilson (backs).

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