New UK map in 2050 predicts UK seashores will disappear as parts submerge underwater

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New climate change map shows vacation hot spots and transportation routes completely underwater, and experts now warn environmental changes must be made before it’s too late

Parts of the country could look like this in 30 years if we don’t act quickly, climate change experts say

The UK’s popular holiday destinations and vital roads could be wiped out by flooding from climate change, experts warn.

Coastal areas and lowlands vulnerable to flooding could be completely submerged in water in thirty years if no action is taken, they warn.

Parts of North Wales and East England will likely be underwater by 2050 due to rising sea levels, which could wash away rail tracks and swampy farmland and resorts.

In the south, coastal areas and river valleys would be severely affected with the M4 motorway submerged near the Severn Bridge.

Central Climate, a nonprofit focused on climate science, exposed the seriousness of this threat and produced a searchable map that you can adjust based on expected sea level rise.

The maps show how rapidly climate change is accelerating and illustrate which areas of the UK are most vulnerable to flooding.

Large areas of Cardiff and Swansea in Wales would be left underwater, as well as almost all of the flat and low land between King’s Lynn and Peterborough on the east coast of England.








New maps show how coastal areas are expected to steadily fall below sea level over the next 30 years
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Picture:

Central Climate)




London, parts of the Kent coast and the estuaries of the Humber and Thames are also threatened.

Since 1993, sea level growth has accelerated at an average of 0.12 to 0.14 inches per year, about twice the long-term trend.

Climate Central’s modeling is based on the projection that its rapid growth in the rate of sea level rise will continue.








Floods like this could become a much more common sight by 2050
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Picture:

PENNSYLVANIA)











Flood waters surround a church in Tirley, Gloucestershire, more rain in northern England could lead to further flooding in already sensitive areas
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Picture:

PENNSYLVANIA)




According to the organization, coastal areas are expected to fall steadily below sea level over the next 30 years.

In 2019, a study predicted that the sea level would rise from 30 cm to 34 cm by 2050. However, so far, sea level rise has been much lower.

After 2,000 years of little change, according to the US Environmental Protection Agency, sea level began to rise throughout the 20th century.

Frequent storm surges also threaten the region’s main transport routes, and the area on both sides of the Bristol Channel is most at risk.








Storm surges threaten to block transport routes across the country
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Picture:

PENNSYLVANIA)




Climate Central, which provides authoritative information to help the public and policymakers make informed decisions about climate and energy, says the risk of flooding could be three times greater than expected.

There are three main reasons the sea rises in warmer temperatures.

Huge ice caps at the poles are melting faster than they form because snowfall loads more water around the earth, ice at high altitudes melts at higher points, and heat causes them to expand. oceans.

Experts say the causes of human-made global warming include the burning of fossil fuels – coal, gas and oil – factory farming and increased animal production and deforestation.

While these are gradual changes that could take a few years to reach the levels shown on the map, once they are noticeable it will be too late to stop them.








New maps show how rapidly climate change is accelerating and illustrate which areas of the UK are most vulnerable to flooding
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Picture:

Central Climate)




The map shows that the majority of the coastline will be underwater, with much of it entirely submerged.

But these images are based on predictions if no action is taken, such as emission reductions.

Local authorities already have access to small-scale ground-level surveys to understand the risk of sea level rise in particular areas and to make planning decisions. The new global data can be used with these local studies, he added.








Climate Central has revealed the severity of this threat in its searchable maps
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Picture:

Central Climate)




Dr Scott Kulp, senior scientist at Climate Central and lead author of the study, said: “These assessments show the potential of climate change to reshape cities, economies, coasts and entire regions of the world over the course of our time. life.

“As the tide line rises higher than the ground that people call home, nations will increasingly face the question of whether, how much and how long coastal defenses can protect them. “

Earlier this month, two academics from Bangor University also warned that many sandy North Wales beaches could be lost over the next 80 years.

Oceanographers Dr Yueng Dern Lenn and Dr Mattias Green, who have published a new book, “30 Second Oceans,” which examines the future of the world’s seas, said extremely expensive dykes and other mitigation measures would be the only line of defense as the sea level rises. .






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